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I have 6 yellow labs in my tank along with other cichlids, 5 of the yellow labs are the same in color but the 6th one is more of a golden yellow almost like orange. I attached pictures. Can anyone tell me if that yellow lab looks like a hybrid.
 

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This fish does not look like a hybrid to me. Labidochromis have a characteristic body shape that is quite distinct from other Mbuna, and I see no evidence that this fish has body morphometrics that are different from wild-type Labidochromis. What I do see is a fish that is hyperxanthic, that is, he has more yellow pigment than most.

Labidochromis caeruleus exhibit a wide range of body colors in nature. As originally described, this is a fish with a white body. Selective breeding in captivity by Pierre Brichard and others resulted in the 'Electric Yellow' variant that now predominates the hobby. The important point here is that there is a great deal of genetic variation in the amount of yellow pigment in this species; just look amongst the fry of a given brood, and you will see some fishes that are very yellow, and others that appear 'washed-out.' Your fish just has more yellow pigment than most.

Quantitative variations in the amount of yellow/orange pigment are often selected in 'line-bred' aquarium fishes to produce more 'colorful' strains. For example, Tropheus sp. 'black' Bemba is a black fish with a wide orange band that bisects the mid-body. Tropheus sp. 'black' Bemba Red is a line-bred derivative that produces more pigment, so the mid-body band appears red. Goldfish are another good example, as is Labidochromis caeruleus. The production of xanthic pigments can also be influenced by diet.
 
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