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In the first pic, it looks like a peacock/mbuna mix.

2nd and 3rd pics look more like M. estherae, but is it really truly yellow, or a pale orange?

Kim
 

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Looks like an adult male estherae/caeruleus mix to me (red zebra/yellow lab). Nice looking fish though, haven't seen pics of them as adults.
 

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i was wondering :?
i was at an lfs yesterday, they had 2 different yellow fish in 1 tank. 1 with the black trim and 1 without. tank was labeled labini/yellow

i asked what the other yellow fish was without the black they said they were both yellow labs. that there are 2 types 1 with the black and 1 that is solid yellow. like the fish pictured above.

my question is ---- is there two types of yellow labs? like the lfs said or is he just wrong! :-?
 

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there is the electric yellow lab and another type that has a white belly, they are from opposite sides of Lions Cove. the black can fade in/out depending on mood but solid yellow most likely kenyi or saulosi
 

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Joea,

On this I really must disagree. If you have "Malawi cichlids in their natural habitat" 3rd edition; go to page 131 first complete paragraph. In it Ad Konings writes:

"Within a single population of L. caeruleus there may be some individuals with a black submarginal band in the dorsal and some that are entirely white. Some polymorphism should not be regarded as specific variation. There is a gradual change in the color pattern of the individuals of each neighboring population. In Tanzania the most northerly populations are entirely white; at Lundu males have a yellowish patch on the head; at Thumbi Point males have a blue hue all over the body; and at Liuli the population exhibit a degree of barring on a white body, a feature that is intensified in those at Hongi and Lundo Island. In Mozambique, at Liutche these bars have almost disappeared, and at Londo L. caeruleus is white with a black band in the dorsal fin. Mixed populations (with or without a submarginal band in the dorsal) are also found at Nkhata Bay in Malawi."

If you then turn the page to 132; there are 10 photographs of L. caeruleus from various locations ranging from pure white(Kaiser Point) to the traditional yellow with black bands (Lion's Cove) to blue with vertical black barring (Undu Point). Photograph 6 in the lower left of page 132 is a specimen at Nkhata Bay, it is a light yellow with a black submarginal band..........read the last sentence of the above paragraph.
 

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etcbrown said:
Photograph 6 in the lower left of page 132 is a specimen at Nkhata Bay, it is a light yellow with a black submarginal band..........read the last sentence of the above paragraph.
I hardly think a light yellow Nkhata Bay variant, without a submarginal black band could ever be confused as a hybrid M. estherae/L. caeruleus.

But if it's distinct accuracy you're after (even though I thought it was clear we were discussing bright yellow fish like the one pictured, not pale to light yellow, very uncommon fish in the hobby), let me be more precise, so I won't have to respond to any Axelrod quotes that may pop up....

He's just wrong. There is no naturally occurring Lion's Cove L. caeruleus that is pure yellow. They're hybrids, a cross of Metriaclima estherae and L. caeruleus and are unfortunately sold as pure in many cases.
 

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Joea said:
He's just wrong. There is no naturally occurring Lion's Cove L. caeruleus that is pure yellow. They're hybrids, a cross of Metriaclima estherae and L. caeruleus and are unfortunately sold as pure in many cases.
I agree...

I had the misfortune of purchasing some of those hybrids, and was not aware until fry were produced without any hint of black.

Unfortunately, we're talking tank raised fish here, not wild ones. And these hybrids are becoming so common that I refuse to even buy anymore tank raised Yellow labs.

Kim
 

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Joea said:
etcbrown said:
Photograph 6 in the lower left of page 132 is a specimen at Nkhata Bay, it is a light yellow with a black submarginal band..........read the last sentence of the above paragraph.
I hardly think a light yellow Nkhata Bay variant, without a submarginal black band could ever be confused as a hybrid M. estherae/L. caeruleus.

But if it's distinct accuracy you're after (even though I thought it was clear we were discussing bright yellow fish like the one pictured, not pale to light yellow, very uncommon fish in the hobby), let me be more precise, so I won't have to respond to any Axelrod quotes that may pop up....

He's just wrong. There is no naturally occurring Lion's Cove L. caeruleus that is pure yellow. They're hybrids, a cross of Metriaclima estherae and L. caeruleus and are unfortunately sold as pure in many cases.
I'm glad I don't think that differing views are personal attacks. I take solace in knowing that just because someone proselytizes their view louder than most, it doesn't make it right. :thumb:
 
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