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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This topic has come up in a couple of recent conversations. I would like to know what Temperature you keep your tanks at and why.

Thanks.
Aaron
 

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All over the board within a range of 76-82. I have tanks that go higher in the summer time.

Why? Because precision just doesn't matter, at least not in my experience.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well, I use to shoot for 78-80, but I wonder if that is to hot. Granted what I am saying is simply repeating a conversation with a few other people, but I am convinced we cook our fish.

In the wild fish are able to move from shallower to deeper water, stationary fish like shell dwellers are subject to currents that vary in temperature from the water around them.

My apartment stays 70-75 depending on what I am doing (working on something, out of shower, ect). Too cold to ditch the heaters?
 

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My tanks range from 77-79. About a year ago, I had a heater stick on and the tank got up to 92 before I caught it. All the fish survived no problem. In Back to Nature, Ad Konings recommends keeping the tank at 25C - 27C (77F - 80.6F). In reality, I think the fish are a bit more flexible than this. They might do ok at 75, but I think your low point of 70 is stretching a bit too far.
 

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Lake Tang exhibits mild temperature stratification- even the hypolimnion is still ~24 degrees C, and the surface waters only vary 2 degrees throughout the year (25-27 degrees). So, in Fahrenheit, the total range of temperatures from top to bottom, winter to summer, is about 75-80 degrees. So no, we're not cooking our fish. :thumb:

Here's an excellent read on Lake Tanganyikan limnology, if you can stay awake through it: http://edepot.wur.nl/121977

My tanks? They're all over the place. As Tim said, I haven't found it to be a big deal. My house gets down to 55 degrees at night, and only up to 65 when we're home in the winter. We don't have air conditioning, so for a few days in the summer, it gets up to 90. Let's just say my Tangs outlast my heaters! :lol:

I try to keep my tanks above 76 degrees, because I see slower growth in fry and little breeding from my adults. My best fry growth is at about 80 degrees, but that gets expensive to maintain on the big tanks.
 

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my tanks stay in the 74-80 range without heaters. I sometimes use a small space heater to maintain room temp if it gets cold at night. Much easier than me worrying about 12+ heaters.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Triscuit

Most literature I have read states that temperature varies 6 degrees Fahrenheit, so I agree with all the information you gave. But do you not think that its a big deal to keep our tanks pretty consistent at 80 and never give take the temperature back down to 74-75?

You said yourself you get less spawning and slower fry growth when the temperature is lower so it obviously effects the fish.

I guess temperature could play more of a factor with certain species.

May not be a big deal, I'm just curious :D
 

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I shoot for 78 and have found the fish become lethargic and don't eat enthusiastically at or under 74 degrees.
 

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ahud said:
Triscuit

Most literature I have read states that temperature varies 6 degrees Fahrenheit, so I agree with all the information you gave. But do you not think that its a big deal to keep our tanks pretty consistent at 80 and never give take the temperature back down to 74-75?
In an ideal world, I could set a heater to 78 degrees and magically my tank water would stay at 78 degrees. But, that's not the case: heaters are not built well enough to withstand the 30 degree temperature shifts in my house. Someday when I have a fish room (not this house!) I'll have the room at 78 degrees because I believe that's best for the fish.

However, I have good color, spawning, and growth as long as the tanks are usually above 76 degrees. So is it a big deal? Nah- it'd be better to be more consistent, but until I find the perfect heater or turn up the thermostat for the house, it's not going to happen.

There was one time my paracyp tank got down to 65 degrees- the heater failed. I just noticed the fish color and behavior, and started bring the temperature back up with water changes, then a new heater. They got a 10 degree bump within 8 hours, and all the fish survived. They are hardier than we give them credit for...
 

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75-81°F (24-27°C).
Warmer end for ones I want to grow fast and breed fast.
Lower end for those I want to reduce the agression of and keep the longest.
Some luck involved as I find heater stats you can fiddle for ages and not get the exact temp you want. So about + or - 1 degree from the average what I realy want and varies by about 1-2 degrees each day, cool in the morning raising through the day cooling at night (A bit more variety not aimed for but got on waterchange days).
Sadly not much chance of tanks overheating here except when we very occationaly get freek wheather. Rooms air generaly kept at 20 °C in the day about 12 °C at night.
Heaterstats braking, constantly on or off is the only occational prob. :thumb:

All the best James
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I have been checking the temperature in a unheated tank and my temperature stays 76.5 pretty consistent.

Would you ditch a heater?
 

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If you set it at 74, it won't come on unless it gets really cold. You don't want your tank to go below that regularly IMHO. I'd check other sources of electical usage like filters that stay on 24/7.
 
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