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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 75 gallon tank with Black Calvus about an inch long, Gold Occelatus and Cyprichromis. What are the best foods to feed them? I have read various things.
 

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Agree, New Life Spectrum Cichlid Formula. Or Northfin Cichlid Formula. 1mm sinking pellets.
 

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That will not hurt the fish, but Mysis are more nutritious. Or hatch your own brine shrimp. These would be the occasional treat, not a staple food.

Note this is not an improvement on the nutrition provided by the NLS or Northfin.

More to amuse the fish keeper than make the fish healthier.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well I don't need to spend money for wasted causes lol. Thanks DJ....How about my 240 tank that has mostly mbunas and a few Haps and Peacocks?
 

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Same answer but no extra protein treats.
 

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Another possibility would be white worms - get a starter culture, propagate them, and raise your own food.

I've found that mbuna, haps, julies, n. cylindricus/pulcher, and multis all love them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
wryan said:
Another possibility would be white worms - get a starter culture, propagate them, and raise your own food.

I've found that mbuna, haps, julies, n. cylindricus/pulcher, and multis all love them.
I used to raise mealy worms for Bluebirds to save money. I will look this up and see where to get cultures and more about it.
 

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Check out the ingredients of the one food. Everything is in there.

You mean herbivores versus carnivores?

Although you can go a little heavier on the protein for carnivores the NLS Cichlid Formula still has sufficient protein.

Also it has been learned that the "herbivores" get a decent share of protein from the algae they eat (microorganisms) so the variation in their nutritional needs is less than originally thought.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
DJRansome said:
Check out the ingredients of the one food. Everything is in there.

You mean herbivores versus carnivores?

Although you can go a little heavier on the protein for carnivores the NLS Cichlid Formula still has sufficient protein.

Also it has been learned that the "herbivores" get a decent share of protein from the algae they eat (microorganisms) so the variation in their nutritional needs is less than originally thought.
Fabulous. Makes things SIMPLE! Thanks! BTW I finally finished painting my new 240 gallon tank stand !

IMG_0380.JPG
 

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naturlvr said:
I used to raise mealy worms for Bluebirds to save money. I will look this up and see where to get cultures and more about it.
https://cflas.org/2014/07/19/white-worm-care-sheet/

Probably the best easiest place to obtain a culture is a local fish-keeping club, if you have one available near you. I currently have 6 cultures going in plastic Sterlite "shoe boxes".

White worms require temperature of 70F or less to really thrive and will start to die off if the temp gets to 85F. I keep my cultures on the basement floor and they do well.

Coco fiber - which is used as bedding for reptiles - is probably the best growth medium. Sterilized potting soil is also an alternative. I've used both and prefer the coco fiber.

Some folks suggest placing moistened bread (the food) on top of the bedding. I don't like doing that, as it tends to mold pretty quickly ... often before it has been consumed. Instead what I do is dig a hole to the bottom of the container and place ground up, stale bread products in it, moistening them after they have been placed and then covering with bedding. This prevents mold and avoids any smells that might occur as a consequence of decomposition. Since the containers (except for their lids) are clear, they can be easily checked by looking up through the bottom to see if the worms have consumed all their food and whether it is time to replenish.

To harvest the worms I place a container on an old heating pad set on "High" for 30 - 60 minutes. This drives the worms to the surface and up on the sides where they can be easily removed with a fork or your finger.

White worms.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
wryan said:
naturlvr said:
I used to raise mealy worms for Bluebirds to save money. I will look this up and see where to get cultures and more about it.
https://cflas.org/2014/07/19/white-worm-care-sheet/

Probably the best easiest place to obtain a culture is a local fish-keeping club, if you have one available near you. I currently have 6 cultures going in plastic Sterlite "shoe boxes".

White worms require temperature of 70F or less to really thrive and will start to die off if the temp gets to 85F. I keep my cultures on the basement floor and they do well.

Coco fiber - which is used as bedding for reptiles - is probably the best growth medium. Sterilized potting soil is also an alternative. I've used both and prefer the coco fiber.

Some folks suggest placing moistened bread (the food) on top of the bedding. I don't like doing that, as it tends to mold pretty quickly ... often before it has been consumed. Instead what I do is dig a hole to the bottom of the container and place ground up, stale bread products in it, moistening them after they have been placed and then covering with bedding. This prevents mold and avoids any smells that might occur as a consequence of decomposition. Since the containers (except for their lids) are clear, they can be easily checked by looking up through the bottom to see if the worms have consumed all their food and whether it is time to replenish.

To harvest the worms I place a container on an old heating pad set on "High" for 30 - 60 minutes. This drives the worms to the surface and up on the sides where they can be easily removed with a fork or your finger.

Thank you Wryan. The temperature thing is the only problem I would have. Great explanation and I do belong to the Raleigh Aquarium Society.
 
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