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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, I know that everyone must be tired of the "cloudy water" questions and I apologize in advance. I have been searching the archives for information and have learned a lot. I'm just not sure that I have found the answer to my particular cloudy water problem. As with many of the people who have posted on this subject, I have never had this problem before in nearly a decade of fish-keeping. Here are the pertinent factors:

1. Added a Hagen GLO double light system to my aquarium.
2. Had algae take off like mad.
3. Experimented with live plants to compete with algae.
4. Watched fishes eat every type of plant that they shouldn't have liked.
5. Removed plants.
6. Scraped algae like a mad-man.
7. Reduced lighting from twelve to six hours a day.
8. Cloudy water kicked in within a few days and has remained since.

Water changes do serve to decrease the cloudiness but it always comes back. Also, the cloudiness is notably decreased in the later evenings, after the lights have been on for about four or five hours. But it is always really cloudy the next morning.

Here are my water parameters:

Ammonia: 0
Nitrite: 0
Nitrate: Less than 5ppm

Has the algae I scraped and the algae that is slowly dying from reduced lighting become food for some kind of "bacterial bloom"? Any other suggestions? UV sterilizer?
 

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I use to have algae bloom sounds similar to what you have. It will go away in time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Unfortunately, I am still unclear about what I am dealing with here. This bloom increases exponentially during the "lights out" period of the day and literally burns off when the lights are on. When the lights first come on, the tank has a thick, "rolling fog" of this haze in the water. It looks just like a dense, misty fog at dawn. By the time the lights are scheduled to go off, it has been reduced to a faint haze. I tried adding a Micron cartridge to the filtration to no avail. I know that the "Hazy Water" article Prov356 referred me to suggested increased lighting as a means of combating inusoria, but my impression of the logic behind that recommendation was to give other plants, Duckweed, specifically, an edge in the competition with algae for nutrients in the water - thus, eliminating a primary food source for the infusoria. But like I said, whatever is causing this fog in my water seems to be adversely effected by the light itself. This is not typical of infusoria, is it?

Any additional input would be appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
No. There is an absolutely negligible amount of it left in the tank from when I switched from a gravel / coral mix to sand, not nearly enough to even consider.
 

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I would try reducing the organic load to absolute minimum and see if that has an effect. Clean the mechanical filter pads, vacuum sand, if needed, and stop feeding entirely for a few days. What's the tank size and fish load? I'm thinking along the lines of your earlier comment on the scraping off of algae. What you may be seeing is a heterotrophic bacteria bloom, but not to be confused with nitrifying bacteria associated with cycling a tank. See this site. I couldn't find anything, but am wondering if they're affected by aquarium lighting. Just a shot at something to try, since I'm turning up nothing else but the usual suggestions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for your trouble, PROV356. The tank is a standard fifty-five. I have nine fishes, ranging in size from 1.5 - 4.5 inches. I feed 1mm NLS pellets very conservatively (food is consumed within 45 seconds, or less). I have a Penguin 350 and a Magnum 350 for filtration. The filter sleeve on the Magnum does have the sludge common to canisters but was changed fairly recently, maybe a month and a half ago. I'm actually surprised at how quickly the sludge built up again. I added a micron filter to the intake of the magnum and have found that it has turned lime-green in color. The color began to show the day I put it on (nearly three days ago) and has steadily gotten darker. Whatever this is, the lighting definitely has an effect on it, directly or indirectly. It is unbelievably cloudy when the lights come on and almost crystal clear by the time they go off, every day.

The new article also made sense in some regards to my scenario. But, like you, I am very perplexed by the light issue. I will go ahead and remove the sludge-covered filter sleeve in the Magnum but there are no other obvious sources of excessive nutrients, dead algae aside, that I can think of. I change roughly 40% of the water and vacuum twice a week. I'm at a loss. I'm tired of people asking me why I don't clean my aquarium... :)
 
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