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I would like the benefit of a wet/dry filtration system on my 75 gal. community tank but I can't afford the possibility of a failure. I live in an apartment on the 2nd floor and am already pressing my luck with the three tanks I have. Having a leak would be disastrous.

As such, I am looking at the Eheim Wet/Dry 2227. It seems to incorporate the benefits of wet/dry while also preventing the possibility of a flood. I currently have an emperor 400 and an aquaclear 70. Does anybody have any suggestions?
 

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I aim interested in this as well..I saw the eheim wet/dry after I already picked up my two cans for my 75 gallon...the reviews on it look very good...but I too would like to hear what people have to say about it
 

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Eheim Wet/Dry 2227/2229 are great for a bio filter, but you won't get any mechanical filtration out of them, strictly for bio. I have a 72 gal bow I have two Rena xp3 and a powerhead 600gph that runs during the day and I am very satisfied with the set up.
 

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i own 3 of the 2229's, my suggestion is to either get something like an xp3(substitute any canister of your choice here), or go to a real wet/dry system, my 2229's are collecting dust in a corner. they do work but i was less than satisfied with operation. Just for info i live on the 3rd floor of a 9 unit apartment building and have a 135, 125 and a 55 all running wet/dry's and have no problems with my systems, IF it is designed correctly you will not have flooding issues, mine are quiet enough for my tastes, since i found out how to use the modified durso drains, i also use mag drive return pumps, they have great reliability, and operate well for me, i have at least one mag 7 running for about 3 years now with no problems.

herb
 

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Yep, no need to fear the wet/dry sump. The intake level of the return pump should be set so that the pump starts sucking in air before it can send enough water back to the tank to overflow it.

In fact, the wet/dry is actually safer since the overflow limits the amount of water that could leak out. If a canister leaked, it could drain your tank all the way down to the intake.
 

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Agreed, if a wet/dry is setup correctly, there should be no risk of overflowing. Get the correct size sump, set the box height inside the tank, put in a siphon-break, and test the system to ensure the system works in the event of a power failure or glitch.
 

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I have talked about this on several other threads so instead of typing it all again I will link you to the latest. Guy was asking about whether he should consider a wet/dry or just use his two canisters that he already had. I get sick and tired of people trying to steer other people away from using wet/dry sumps because "they can flood your house!" Anyway just go read page 3 on this thread.

If you have any questions feel free to ask. :thumb:
 

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FWIW, a tank with a built in overflow can be made bullet proof with enough research and gadgets. ie float switches in the tank and sump.....

I've heard (but don't know if it's true) that hang on overflows can not be made bullet proof. But they can be close to bullet proof.
 

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fish said:
FWIW, a tank with a built in overflow can be made bullet proof with enough research and gadgets. ie float switches in the tank and sump.....

I've heard (but don't know if it's true) that hang on overflows can not be made bullet proof. But they can be close to bullet proof.
Yeah I covered that on that other thread I linked in my previous post.
 

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There should be no need for gadgets of any sort. Check valves and float valves can fail and shouldn't be relied upon completely. Adjusting your pump intake so that it physically can't pump enough water back to the tank is the ultimate safeguard.
 

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Yeah I don't advocate using check valves or float switches. They really aren't necessary and can fail so why waste the money? But I cover how to make a wet/dry bomb proof so even worse case scenario no water reaches your floor.
 

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How about making sure you have renters insurance just in case you don't already? You should have it tanks or no tanks, especially if you were to have a fire or some other unfortunate disaster.
 

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I am advocating float switches not check valves or float valves. A float switch is an electronic switch that can be used to shut down your pump if the water level is:

a) to high in the tank

b) to high in your sump

c) or to low in the sump.

I second renters insurance! :thumb:
 

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Electrical float switches can still fail. I have even seen backup float switches on systems fail. They should not be your safety measure or at least not the only one.
 

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A float switch is still a good idea to use as a safe guard. I'd elevate the pump so it can't physically put enough water in the tank to flood but I'd also use a float switch in hopes it would turn the pump off before it got to that point so that the risk of burning up the pump while it runs dry is at least lessened. I'd definitely spend a few bucks on a switch to help protect a $100+ pump.
 

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But those few bucks aren't needed if you take simple precautions. If you want to use them then go for it. Are they needed? No. To each their own.
 
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