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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've had the Venustus for around six months now.

Only recently, after a few new fish were introduced, I've noticed that his very brown spots and light yellow turns into an overall lightly brown and yellow color as the brown spots fade and almost bleed into his yellow body color.

His behavior, however, does not change at all.

So what is going on?
 

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Sounds like it's a male, beginning to take on his male colouration.

Kim
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
sorry for not being clear. he is a good 5.5" - 6" and has always shown a very striking yellow with the deep brown spots. it's definitely not a maturation thing. and his behavior doesn't change so I don't see how it could be a breeding thing (there are no female venustus in the tank and only one or two females in the tank in general, none of which the venustus has ever paid attention to).
 

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I've had males convince me that they were female right up-to five inches... and to add... females will also fade their spots when feeling very confident or when being aggressive... it is a common thing for Malawi cichlids change colour /pattern quickly.... it's part of the enjoyment of keeping them...
 

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It is his breeding dress like cichlidaholic said. The fish shows this color to show other fish that he is dominant. He may not be the most dominant fish in your tank but being that you added more fish he is showing them with color displays that he is more dominant than them.My venustus is the most dom. in my tank so he keeps this greenish-yellow color all the time and I think it looks cool :thumb: .
 

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cholile, maybe I was the one who wasn't too clear!

nimboman has said it much better than I did.

Just be aware that the male venustus may crossbreed with some of your other fish, if it isn't an all male tank. Keeping lone mbuna isn't a good idea if you wish to breed. It doesn't sound like you're interested in breeding with just a couple of females, but it will happen! And, as all your fish mature, those two females can really stir up the aggression in the tank.

Kim
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
i monitor the aggression and there really has not been much of any, but of course if i see anything due to the presence of a few females then I will remove them. I only have them because I bought them as juvies and they turned out to be females. no interest in breeding at all.
 

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I understand. :thumb:

Just keep in mind that they are in the tank, should aggression problems arise between the males. Hormones can do some crazy things inside these glass boxes!

Kim
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
will do.

is there any way to figure out if aggression is due to the presence of females (other than taking the females out and seeing if the aggression dissipates)?

what level of aggression is considered too much aggression (in other words, what level of aggression likely leads to disease or death)?
 

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Well, you're right on removing the females...That's the only way to tell what kind of problems they are causing. But I can assure you that anytime there are a couple of females in a mostly male tank, they are causing problems... :wink:

As far as the aggression level, if you're having continued health problems in a tank and you're having problems with aggression, it's too high. I know that's vague, but keep in mind that almost every illness in a fish tank can be traced back to some stressor. This is one you have total control over. :thumb:

Kim
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
ok. well i see very little aggression (and i watch what goes on in the tank pretty frequently since i'm home often and do work right in front of the tank). i've had a few false alarms where i thought fish were ill but i was wrong (I saw them spit up food a few times, but then that was it. since then all are eating like pigs once again). So i'll keep an eye out.
 

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Some people use nipped or torn fins as an indicator of too much aggression. Or fish hiding behind equipment or at the surface.
 
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