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I have the opportunity to but a used 100g Acrylic aquarium with nothing wrong except for one of the corners of the built-in overflow is cracked. Is this a huge issue to fix, and either way how would I go about fixing this.
 

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It can probably be fixed by attaching pieces of acrylic to the inside of the overflow over the crack, but a pic would help in making that call. If it's what I'm picturing, it's a very easy and inexpensive fix.
 

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Since the overflow will have little pressure on it, there might be an easy fix to consider. Corners can be awkward due to the shape. I have used silicone to form a "dam" over a damaged area. If it has no water now is a good time. I bent light cardboard (cereal box) around the damaged area, clamping one inside and one outside with clothes pins. Then I filled the gap between with silicone and tamped it down into the little nicks and gaps. Once it set totally, I peeled the cardboard off and trimmed to look nicer. Worked for several years before I sold the tank. The clear silicone did not show much at all.
 

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This is just a guess, but I would think that if the crack were tight using the correct solvent cement would re fuse the material, like it would if you were assembling 2 pieces.
 

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BillD said:
This is just a guess, but I would think that if the crack were tight using the correct solvent cement would re fuse the material, like it would if you were assembling 2 pieces.
It would, but hard to do with a crack. Depends on where it is. You'd have to get the tank situated so that the crack was perfectly horizontal. Then you'd have to be able to set the width just right to allow for capillary action to pull the liquid solvent in. Then apply some pressure. Very hard to do with the liquid solvent on an existing tank. Much easier when first assembling.

Better to use acrylic piece(s) that you can lather up with the weldon16, which is more like a glue, and then attach that onto the inside of the overflow. Since it's the overlow, won't be seen. You could do this to tank surfaces, but obviously would be very unsighlty uless a tank back. The thicker stuff doesn not fill cracks on it's own very well, so the scrap piece for a patch would be needed.

I've sealed up new tanks by making up my own solvent mix. If you add acrylic shavings to the liquid solvent, it'll thicken it up a bit. I then used an applicator to run a bead down the seam on the inside of the tank. Of course you have to get them positioned corretly. When the solvent evaporates (which it's designed to do), it leaves the acrylic behind and makes a seal. Sort of like silicone seals on glass tanks, although thinner and trnasparent.

These were laid out against the wall at an angle for sealing the lower seam.



I needed to do this because I ended up with some cheap import acrylic that didn't bond perfectly at the seams. It worked, 8 tanks, 4 sumps done this way. 18 months later, no leaks.
 
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