Cichlid Fish Forum banner
1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My beautiful guys aren't getting along well and so I'm splitting them into two tanks. 5 in a 40 and 9 in a 50. At a year old, they have a pretty huge variation in size, no doubt from being overpopulated in a 50 g. My question is, they don't seem to get along even in the reduced numbers. Can these fish live in a 50 gallon together or do I have the wrong breed for my small tanks?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
update, I've taken the most aggressive of the smaller guys and confined him to a floating tank. The others are milling around along the bottom..at ease for the first time. Except for one badly beaten (I think male) that is still shell shocked and in hiding. I also, moved two more larger, but badly beaten from the 50 gallon tank. So now it's 7 in 40 and it looks peaceful. The Fifty has aggressive nipping going on still, heavier at feeding times. I wish I could sex them. I may try taking some pics for you guys. My dubiosi are another story. GORGEOUS and breeding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
481 Posts
IMHO, those tanks are too small, but, you would be far better off with all of them together in one tank. The more of them the easier it will be as far as agression. I would personally keep the decor to a minimum, maybe get some clout or metro ready and let them get the pecking order straight. May I ask why you split them in the first place?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
RayQ said:
IMHO, those tanks are too small, but, you would be far better off with all of them together in one tank. The more of them the easier it will be as far as agression. I would personally keep the decor to a minimum, maybe get some clout or metro ready and let them get the pecking order straight. May I ask why you split them in the first place?
They were killing each other. The initial colony was two dozen. After 8 months they began to abuse one anothers fins. I can't find a place for another tank...especially 100 gallons. Right now I have 3 55 gallons, a 29, and 2 40's.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,748 Posts
marsbennett said:
Do I have the wrong breed for my small tanks?
Yes and insuficient numbers. Best keep fish that are suited to your tank long term. Tropheus get awful mean when they start to breed. Its not that it can not work in a 50g tank its just you kind of have to be real lucky. Sad thing is mixing em or popping em in a larger tank prob will not sort the problem. Once a group goes bad best leave it and ride the storm I think. You may get a smaller group with just one male surviver and some females. Odds are in a 50g that you will get just one male surviver but then I hope you are the lucky type. Add some plastic breeding tubes they give cover without adding to territoriality/ aggression and remove any rockwork.
5 foot tanks can be used for breeding bad groups but even that is not always an easy ride.

Kind of the reason these fish command high prices. They are not always easy. Mixing groups is best done at under 2". I fear it may be well to late for your groups to mix em.

All the best James
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
358 Posts
Hi,

I do agree that you should keep adult tropheus in such small tanks. It´s impossible to have them in that size (even in high numbers). I have 14 WC ilangis in a 5 ft tank and they do get along fine (even after breeding, that happened just one month after I put them into this tank).

If you can´t have a bigger tank you should think on seeling those fish. Sorry but it´s really my honest opinion.

Cheers,
Diogo
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I"m learning the hard way, too. I have pictures of the survivors...they don't even behave the same. The larger pod killed off 2 of their own and then seemed to chill out now. My dubiosi tank is a wonderful thing to view. They are all perfect condition and breeding like mad.

Do you guys recommend leaving the holding dubiosi females in the main tank? I have so far because I didn't want to stress them in the chase. They are so gorgeous and healthy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Best not take her out and seperate her from the others, She won't be let back into the group, She'll "lose her place" amongst her group. I'd just wait then catch her, strip the fry from her mouth and put her straight back in the tank again :thumb:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,748 Posts
Farside said:
Best not take her out and seperate her from the others, She won't be let back into the group, She'll "lose her place" amongst her group. I'd just wait then catch her, strip the fry from her mouth and put her straight back in the tank again :thumb:
I would try the opposite. Pop her in a brooding tank and let her raise the young for three weeks poste release. And feed her up so she is in breeding condition again. Then when you pop her back, she will not be half starved and easily beeten up but be the girl the boys all fight over.
To stop the boys fighting while she is away then take out the rocks, reduce the lighting remove the substrate and lower the temp and remove all other females, all these help to reduce agression amongst the boys.

All the best James
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Updated:

Both tanks of ilangi are now chilled. the killing has stopped, although I don't see any efforts to mate as yet. it's almost like they are a little depressed not to be able to beat the **** out of someone.

The duboisi tanks is amazing. It is a little harder for me to tell when one of those females is holding. They seem to continue eating at the same time...just less. I'm finding little guys under rocks etc. I'm wondering if I take these babies out and add them to the tank where I already have one duboisi growing out...will they be safe with him? The single juvenile is quite a bit larger than the new ones.

As to stripping, I tried that once with an Electric Yellow. As gently as I could be, I still nearly killed her. I could see bruises where my fingers where. Now I'm afraid to strip holding mothers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
marsbennett said:
Updated:

Both tanks of ilangi are now chilled. the killing has stopped, although I don't see any efforts to mate as yet. it's almost like they are a little depressed not to be able to beat the #%$& out of someone.

The duboisi tanks is amazing. It is a little harder for me to tell when one of those females is holding. They seem to continue eating at the same time...just less. I'm finding little guys under rocks etc. I'm wondering if I take these babies out and add them to the tank where I already have one duboisi growing out...will they be safe with him? The single juvenile is quite a bit larger than the new ones.

As to stripping, I tried that once with an Electric Yellow. As gently as I could be, I still nearly killed her. I could see bruises where my fingers where. Now I'm afraid to strip holding mothers.
Ha ha you must have been doing it wrong mate, You dont need to hold them very tight at all, You must have super strong hands haha. Make sure you don't cover the gills either, Just to make sure you dont damage them. I just cup my hand with the fish in it gently (Just enough to stp them slipping out), Then gently push down the mouth with the rounded bit of a paper clip whilst holding her over a small container with tank water in it, She automaticly then spits all the fry out. Very important not to force, She should spit the fry out almost like you hit a "eject button" if it's done right lol. Also it helps if you have her head in the water when doing it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
223 Posts
marsbennett, did your ilangis ever breed for you? I live in NC also and just got some ilangis recently. They are very interesting to watch. I'm really enjoying them!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,748 Posts
The best tank for breeding these guys is 72"x24"x24" but few can stretch that far.
A good comprimise is 60"x18"x18" I had good success with this size tank and will try it again.
But then we all hear of folk who manage in 48"x15"x15" or so.
Nope not had much luck with one male and a bunch of females in this sort of tank myself.
Multie male tanks with an excess of room and filtration is the only thing that has worked for me long term

My 75g tank (three years now) is a failure breeding wise. I do not have more 2" young than I started with.

I do not strip Tropheus. It is not my idea of fun nor is it needed.

Hate to say it but someone should make a video of stripping Tropheus.
I will not use it but it could prevent a lot of problems for folk determined to try this way.

All the best James
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
189 Posts
Cannot really offer much advice as still a "noob" where Tropheus are concerned.
I would agree that a 5' tank is better than a 4', when I first enquired about getting some Tropheus I was advised on this, I now have a 6' tank with two Tropheus groups in there, they all look healthy and are growing well, they show spawning behaviour, I have attempted to remove some of the females to check for holdong and strip but never have much success catching them so leave them in there to avoid stress. They may never hold long term as the tank has minimal rockwork and is quite a busy tank.
I like the idea of adding plastic pipes and removing the rocks, sounds good.
Also just to note, the amopunt of folks advising ti keep Trophs in a 4' tank, ai just wont do it, my own 4' seems quite overstocked , i.e. 2 types of shellies, rock dwellers and a big bunch of young cyps but running 3 external filters...... not a permanent set up...
I have seen Troph tank with no rockwork at all so maybe this might ease the aggression ?

Cheers, Sean
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Just put five 2 inch Ilangi in a 100 gallon 5 ft long, 2 ft deep tank .

Fingers crossed that things work out with them, no colour on any of them and I don't know the sex.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,459 Posts
Norm said:
Just put five 2 inch Ilangi in a 100 gallon 5 ft long, 2 ft deep tank .

Fingers crossed that things work out with them, no colour on any of them and I don't know the sex.
You really ought to try and get some more buddy. Five is not a good number. Just as an example, I keep two 5' 120g tanks with 30 in one tank and around 36 in the other.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Best I can do and I would like to have purchased more but 5 is all they had and I very rarely see them in our area noddy.

They are expensive here but I made an offer for all five and saved $50.00 as they were being sold at $35.00 each or 3 for $90.00.
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top