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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am about to introduce my first fish in my Tanganyika community aquarium, and hence couldn't not introduce also some shell dwellers. however i would like to know which are the most popular and most commonly available in the hobby. Thanks.
 

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First, what are the dimensions of the tank and what are you planning to add with them?
Planning on sand substrate? Let's get a starting point for better responses :wink:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
well ok. Tank is 240ltr. The first fish to be introduced will be the five-bar cichlid (i call it the small frontosa). added to them later will be julies and leleupis and neolamprologus sp. I dodn't use sand but fine black gravel (2mm), and will add the shell assortments this week.
 

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I would say that the Neolamprologus Multifaciatus is the most commonly available shell dweller that I have seen.

But as TM said other info would be kinda imperative as to whether or not they would be a good idea or not.
 

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There are 3 shell dwellers that I would say are the most common, Brevis, multies and occies. The ocellatus can probably stand up for themselves better than the rest, but multies are considered the easiest to breed.

I'm afraid the 5-bar you are referring to might be trets? they can be pretty violent and shell dwellers might not do to well.
 

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Leleupis will eat all the shellie fry and have been known to pull parents out of the shell and kill them in the process. And we still don't know which Neolamps you are considering (hopefully not Brichardi). :-?

Over here, Shellies215 is correct about the 3 most common ones, but availability may be different where you are. My only experience is with Multies. One of my favorite Tangs. All their social and breeding habits, not to mention their digging, are very entertaining.

240 liters is ok, but by "dimensions" I was referring to length x width x height. That's what really matters here since you'll be mixing species. Different species need room to spread out and claim territories, so the physical size of the tank matters more than just it's water volume. Hope that helps explain why I'm asking.
 

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I'm picturing a standard 75 gallon tank (4'x18" footprint). If that's the case, you probably have one too many rock dwellers in mix, even with a ton of rockwork.

+1 on trets being super aggressive. Never heard of things going well with them in the tank... even with a species-only tank, they are known to be cold killers.
 

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I'm picturing a standard 75 gallon tank (4'x18" footprint).
I'd like to assume it's a 4 footer also but there are 60gal cubes and hexagons out there that are much shorter, so just trying to make sure we know up front what the story is.

So assuming it's 4 foot, the only safe bet so far is shellies with Julies, and that's if you don't care about the Julies preying on the shellie fry.
 
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