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Anyone here know of any good links / advice for taking fish pictures? I've found that when I use my little point and shoot with the flash, I sometimes get washed out / weird looking pictures. If I go without the flash, I get blurry pictures.

...do I just need a better camera?
 

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If your camera has a decently sized lens(this makes a big difference), then you should have no problems taking photos. I have a $200 fujifilm camera that takes excellent shots. I almost always use my "macro" setting or try to manually focus. Shots generally come out clearer with the flash as well, and often you can go back in and add in the color that was washed out with photoshop.
 

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Laurel said:
If your camera has a decently sized lens(this makes a big difference), then you should have no problems taking photos. I have a $200 fujifilm camera that takes excellent shots. I almost always use my "macro" setting or try to manually focus. Shots generally come out clearer with the flash as well, and often you can go back in and add in the color that was washed out with photoshop.
What?!? I guess it could be considered the aperture of the lens is larger with a larger lens, but otherwise that's a poor idea to stand by. I think its highly possible to get good shots without a great camera. I think you can get a good point and shoot to work for that. There are plenty of lighting methods that work. I highly recommend using something to diffuse your flash light. Feel free to post up your camera model and I can work individually with you. A sheet of printer paper works wonders btw ;)
 

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Certainly the quality/price-tag of your camera will play a dominant part in the quality of photos taken, yet it is possible to get some half decent shots with any camera. I think you'll find the key is to spend time watching your fish with it in your hand, you'll soon work out the ideal areas in which the fish photographs best. Using a low quality camera myself, i generally find it best these areas have something else in the frame, to catch the eye of the viewer. Whether this be a plant, large piece of decor or simply a heater, even a patch of bare bottom. Having such things in the picture may not win any contests, yet i find it helps my own.
I use a really basic camera (Kodak eayshare C310) and i manage to get some fairly decent photos, i think. I use no specific lightling, nor techniques but the everyday fluro. I once used a smaller, different fluro for my Red devil, but it gave an inaccurate representation. Another thing i have found with my cam, when not using it's flash, use absolutely no zoom and keep it close to the glass.

Here's a few of my best.






And one with the smaller fluro i spoke of.

 

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Well one thing you should do as a few others have sugested is to use some type of defuser for you're flash to prevent the picture from getting washed out anothe thing you can do is to angle you're camera just a little bit to help with the flash issue, I usualy shoot at a slight down or up angle not alot so that it distorts tho photo but just enugh to have a different angle for the flash. also somthing like a tall chair, tripod, door frame (if one is in the right place) or somthing of that nature to give you more stability and avoid camera shake. and most of all practice with you're camera to find what works best with the settings you have for it.
 

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haibane said:
Laurel said:
If your camera has a decently sized lens(this makes a big difference), then you should have no problems taking photos. I have a $200 fujifilm camera that takes excellent shots. I almost always use my "macro" setting or try to manually focus. Shots generally come out clearer with the flash as well, and often you can go back in and add in the color that was washed out with photoshop.
What?!? I guess it could be considered the aperture of the lens is larger with a larger lens, but otherwise that's a poor idea to stand by. I think its highly possible to get good shots without a great camera. I think you can get a good point and shoot to work for that. There are plenty of lighting methods that work. I highly recommend using something to diffuse your flash light. Feel free to post up your camera model and I can work individually with you. A sheet of printer paper works wonders btw ;)
I've tried taking photos with cameras with smaller lenses, and when the lens is larger, more light is able to hit the sensor at once and you're able to have faster shutter speeds, which are important if you have speedy fish.

I never said that it's not possible to get great shots with a cheap camera. I've proven it myself. I have a CHEAP($200) point and shoot camera that is capable of taking very good photos.






 
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