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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am setting up a 185 gallon tank (I thought it was 200 when I purchased it). I put in a 1,500 Glass-Holes overflow box in the back left corner of my tank. http://www.glass-holes.com/1500-gph-complete-kit-gh1500kit.htm. Currently I also have a 40 gallon breeder tank that I plan on setting up for a sump. From the bottom of my sump to the top of my tank is roughly 5 to 5.5 feet. I also plan on having around 2 elbows in the return piping. What kind of pump and model number do you reccomend?

I am also putting in two Koralia Magnum #6's in each side back corner for additional circulation but I would also like a sump pump that circulates my tank enough if both of the K's were off.
 

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Ideally, you want 1200-1300 GPH @ 6 ft of head pressure.

You could also consider multiple pumps that equal that volume for the sake of redundancy.

I prefer the latter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Fox said:
You might consider a Danner Mag24. Should be able to satisify that overflow.
I will check out the Mag's. Are they reliable, do they have a low power consumption per gph and are they quite?

cantrell00 said:
Ideally, you want 1200-1300 GPH @ 6 ft of head pressure.
You could also consider multiple pumps that equal that volume for the sake of redundancy.
I prefer the latter.
cantrell00 would I hook up the two pumps in parallel connecting to the same discharge piping or run up two different headers? I would prefer the first. Why do I need two pumps instead of just one? I will have an overflow on my sump to a drain so I am not worried about it overflowing and my tank will have two K6 Magnums in the tank for circulation.

Ok so if I want 1,200 gph with a 6' head possibly two pumps what is a good pump manufacture, that isn't overly expensive, runs relatively quiet and has a low power consumption? I know I am asking for a lot.
 

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I have found the danner mags to be quite reliable and for the most part quiet or at the least just as quiet as many similar pumps. If you want silence look at the Eheim 1262 though you might need two. A mag18 might be just a tad short of your overflows but will work just fine while a mag24 might be just a bit over

Not a fan of using two pumps. You could prolly get by just fine with a Mag18 at 5' head gives around 1200 gph and uses 145W. If you were to use two mag9's at 5' head you would get around 1500 gph while using 186W. that is an increase of 25% W of heat added to the system and twice the vibrations/ noise. I would use the mag18 in this instance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
fox said:
I have found the danner mags to be quite reliable and for the most part quiet or at the least just as quiet as many similar pumps. If you want silence look at the Eheim 1262 though you might need two. A mag18 might be just a tad short of your overflows but will work just fine while a mag24 might be just a bit over

Not a fan of using two pumps. You could prolly get by just fine with a Mag18 at 5' head gives around 1200 gph and uses 145W. If you were to use two mag9's at 5' head you would get around 1500 gph while using 186W. that is an increase of 25% W of heat added to the system and twice the vibrations/ noise. I would use the mag18 in this instance.
145W wow those consume a bunch of power compared to the Koralia's. I know they have to pump water up 6' but that just seems like a lot to me. (I'm still relatively new to setting up a big tank and sump). What does the Mag 24 consume? I could always throttle back the 24 with a ball valve.

As far as creating heat in the sump I would be fine with my pump(s) creating some excess heat that just means the heaters wouldn't have to work as hard. Living in Illinois it gets pretty cold during the winter and my heaters have to run most of the time (in my current tanks).
 

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Its not the winters where that heat is a concern. You might find a condition where in the warmer months you will have the heaters unplugged and a tank temp in the mid 80°'s or higher.

All my lights & heat are off in our larger tanks during the daytime and they are at 84° now.

The mag24 uses 265W.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
fox said:
Its not the winters where that heat is a concern. You might find a condition where in the warmer months you will have the heaters unplugged and a tank temp in the mid 80°'s or higher.
Hmmm.... Once you decide to enter the wormhole of big tanks, you've no idea what you've gotten yourself into... So many choices. This is going to take me a while to determine what I should do. So will one pump a mag 24 or 18 heat up my tank to much?
 

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Use two mag9.5's or one mag18 as option A.

Use the mag24 and tee off it to drive the RFUGJ as optionB and you should be ok.
 

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Agridiron...

You are worrying yourself too much. Shoot for somewhere around 1000-1200 GPH. Single pump or multiple pumps.. Debating that issue is trivial & a matter of preference more than anything else.

I don't know anything about mag's so I can't comment on them.

I have found Aquaclear power heads to be incredibly reliable & very quiet assuming you have the vibration isolated.

I prefer submersibles because that is one less hole in the tank (sump) to deal with. Potential leak source.

I would run the return with 3/4" ID vinyl hose with hose clamps. You can run multiple pumps into a single return back to that tank. The pressurized water is going to seek the path of least resistance.

One thing to consider though, if running multiple returns back to the tank you have the ability to create multiple return areas for surface agitation. Using multiple returns spreads the velocity created by 1000-1200 GPH over multiple lines so the current isn't so strong.
 

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I would go with an IWAKI or similar style external pump. Any impeller pump like the Mags will eventually require replacement of the impeller assembly due to degradation of performance and noise... which is almost as expensive as replacing the whole pump.
 

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cichlid_baby said:
Any impeller pump like the Mags will eventually require replacement of the impeller assembly due to degradation of performance and noise... which is almost as expensive as replacing the whole pump.
That's more than a bit of an exaggeration IME. What are you basing this on?
 

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prov356 said:
cichlid_baby said:
Any impeller pump like the Mags will eventually require replacement of the impeller assembly due to degradation of performance and noise... which is almost as expensive as replacing the whole pump.
That's more than a bit of an exaggeration IME. What are you basing this on?
+1

The impeller for a Danner 9.5 or 12 are about $16 +/-. The pump body is built like a lead brick. Don't see a great deal of cost involved with a possible impeller failure.
 

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I use two rio hyperflow 26hf pumps. These are 1000gph each actual measured at the nozzle. For your tank, you can go for two 17hf if you want have something similar. I use two pumps because I can turn one off at night. I have one pump setup with only one nozzle which provide a very strong flow during the day. With one pump you need to split the flow anyway with two outlets. The rio pumps use less power than any other pump on the market.

Here's the pumps:
http://www.fosterandsmithaquatics.com/p ... atid=20170
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
zcfish said:
I use two rio hyperflow 26hf pumps. These are 1000gph each actual measured at the nozzle. For your tank, you can go for two 17hf if you want have something similar. I use two pumps because I can turn one off at night. I have one pump setup with only one nozzle which provide a very strong flow during the day. With one pump you need to split the flow anyway with two outlets. The rio pumps use less power than any other pump on the market.

Here's the pumps:
http://www.fosterandsmithaquatics.com/p ... atid=20170
zcfish. if I went with one 26HF pump should I use a 1.5" discharge piping or do I need to go with a 2" discharge piping to obtain maximum flow?
 

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zcfish. if I went with one 26HF pump should I use a 1.5" discharge piping or do I need to go with a 2" discharge piping to obtain maximum flow?
Unless my very elementary understanding of fluid dyamics is flawed - it won't matter. The diameter of the line effects pressure, not volume.

On a gravity fed circuit, it is the opposite. As the diameter of the line is increased, the volume increases exponentially.
 

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Diameter of the discharge off the pump is very important and Directly Related to the volume of flow the system will recieve.

Some manufacturers state that a minimum of 1-1/2"Ø piping must be used off the pump to achieve the advertised volume of flow. The pressure restriction on the discharge is seen as head restriction to the pump.
 

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The pressure restriction on the discharge is seen as head restriction to the pump.
Makes sense. Didn't think of it in that way. Kinda why I qualified my knowledge as "very elementary"..

I guess this applies at the extremes though. If full pump output is achieved through a 1" line, increasing the line diameter to 2" isn't goint to provide twice the flow. Obviously if you restrict it at the same percentage, flow would be effected..
 

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cantrell00 said:
The pressure restriction on the discharge is seen as head restriction to the pump.
Makes sense. Didn't think of it in that way. Kinda why I qualified my knowledge as "very elementary"..

I guess this applies at the extremes though. If full pump output is achieved through a 1" line, increasing the line diameter to 2" isn't goint to provide twice the flow. Obviously if you restrict it at the same percentage, flow would be effected..
[off-topic]I've been thinking for a while now that positive displacement pumps (rather than centrifugal) might have a place in aquaria. In case you don't know, centrifugal pumps produce pressure, and the flow rate is determined by the restriction (pumbing, valves, etc). A positive displacement pump produces a constant (more or less) flow rate at a given rpm. Basically, that means, you can buy a "rhinox1000" and know you're getting 1000gph out of it regardless of head rise or plumbing (again, more or less and within reasonable head pressures). Problem is, if you restrict a positive displacement pump too much and the presure rise across the pump climbs and eventually the pump goes *pop*. So, from a marketability standpoint, how can you sell one of these to a bunch of customers when you can't control how the customer MAY try to restrict the pump output with, say, a ball valve to reduce the flow (which wouldn't work, but the average customer won't know that, especially since the average customer is used to centrifugal pumps where you CAN do that and it DOES work)? I predict lots of returns and complaints of the pump being faulty.

Just so we're clear, an example of a positive displacement pump is a bicycle pump - if you keep pushing the pump up and down, air keeps going in the tire until the tire or the pump breaks. It gets harder to pump a bike pump because the pressure builds because its positive displacement. To complete the analogy, an air matress pump is a centrifugal pump, and the air matress stops inflating when the pressure inside the matress reaches the maximum pressure the air pump can produce. The bed won't overinflate, and the pump won't be harmed.[/offtopic]

Now you all know my entropeneurial(sp?) plans for becoming a millionaire and can steal my idea :p

carry on.

(I use a rio 32HF by the way)
 
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