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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there…this might seem like a dump question…but i have been wondering about it for some time now…is it really necessary to do gravel vaccuming if we have a substrate that kind of blends in with the fish poop or the flow in our tank is such that the fish poop is only actually at areas that is not in the visible field of the tank or anything like that…Because the main thing is ammonia right?…and wont the ammonia be immediately released into the water right after the fish poops and the remaining is just organic stuff lying there? Also fishes remove ammonia through their gills also so whatever it mayb the BB is feeding on the ammonia that is dissolved in the water and its not necessary for the fishwaste to actually get into the filter media except for the reason that the substrate should look clean right? So just water changes without vaccuming would do the work in removing the nitrates formed righy?
So is gravel vaccuming actually necessary if someone is willing to compromise on the gravel becoming dirty or someone has gravel that doesnt show it lying there?
Thanx in advance😊
 

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It's nitrate. The debris you leave behind will increase your nitrate faster than if you remove it.

If your filter sweeps it all up so your substrate looks pristine, you can remove the solids by cleaning your filter. However, I have never vacuumed my substrate after a period of no vacuuming and had it come up clean enough to make me happy.

You also will get nematodes (usually harmless, but gross) if you don't vacuum...even on a bare bottom tank.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It's nitrate. The debris you leave behind will increase your nitrate faster than if you remove it.

If your filter sweeps it all up so your substrate looks pristine, you can remove the solids by cleaning your filter. However, I have never vacuumed my substrate after a period of no vacuuming and had it come up clean enough to make me happy.

You also will get nematodes (usually harmless, but gross) if you don't vacuum...even on a bare bottom tank.
So that means vaccuming the gravel isn't necessary all the time,i just need to do it during maintainence of my sump right…
 

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If there is no debris or discoloration on your substrate, and it is clean when you do the occasional check with the vacuum, in theory no.

If you like nematodes.

And if your nitrate stays below 20ppm.
 
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I have been keeping fish for over 40 years and I may be “old school” but I think thoroughly vacuuming the gravel during water changes is the single most important thing you can do as a responsible fish keeper. It’s worked very well for me and kept me from having to buy various fish medications over the decades or deal with strange fish die offs. I strongly recommend you keep regularly using that vacuum Mr. Hisham, your fish will be thankful you did and reward you with a lifetime of good health, color, and activity.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I have been keeping fish for over 40 years and I may be “old school” but I think thoroughly vacuuming the gravel during water changes is the single most important thing you can do as a responsible fish keeper. It’s worked very well for me and kept me from having to buy various fish medications over the decades or deal with strange fish die offs. I strongly recommend you keep regularly using that vacuum Mr. Hisham, your fish will be thankful you did and reward you with a lifetime of good health, color, and activity.
Alright then!…Will do for sure always from now onwards😊😊😊…Thankyou😇
 

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Gravel vacuuming once in a while is not only necessary, but it does a great deal to improve the entire health of the aquarium. It was the one thing that I DID do as a teenager even though I had no clue about fish keeping. It also keeps the gravel looking a LOT better.

That being said, I don't vacuum my sand substrate. The poop doesn't settle below the surface of it, and the current in my tank keeps the fish poop heading for the filter. I vacuum my other tank with gravel about every 2 months. Your tank may need it more or less based on fish load. That's my thinking anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Gravel vacuuming once in a while is not only necessary, but it does a great deal to improve the entire health of the aquarium. It was the one thing that I DID do as a teenager even though I had no clue about fish keeping. It also keeps the gravel looking a LOT better.

That being said, I don't vacuum my sand substrate. The poop doesn't settle below the surface of it, and the current in my tank keeps the fish poop heading for the filter. I vacuum my other tank with gravel about every 2 months. Your tank may need it more or less based on fish load. That's my thinking anyway.
Hi i noticed u have a 55gal all male mbunas tank…i have heard that all male tanks are mostly done for peacock and hap tank…and for mbunas the typcial ratio of male to female is done…U have done an all male mbuna tank…Does that work out fine? Also wat stocking du u have in that?
 

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Is there a better vacuuming method other than the siphon type? I have aragonite and when I pour water in at water changes I see debris in one area. It gets stirred up. I run a wave maker (Only after water changes) to try and keep the debris suspened in the water column, but I'm not to sure how well of a job its doing in conjunction with my two HOB filters. I have the Aquaclear 110 and the 70 in a 55 gallon standard aquarium.
 

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What are your issues with the siphon method of vacuuming? What grain size is your aragonite?
 

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With anything approaching gravel vacuuming is essential. Have you tried the Python? Your tap water pressure creates extra suction if gravity alone is not enough.
 
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With anything approaching gravel vacuuming is essential. Have you tried the Python? Your tap water pressure creates extra suction if gravity alone is not enough.
Yes, we had one some years ago. It was 50' long if I remember. I know 25' would be to short.
My wife was taking care of the tank back then and she did not like it.

1) Hose to long and difficult to roll up and store away.
2) It was impossible to get all the water out after use and it would grow algae or bacteria. It would always have a black inside.
3) The valve gave her trouble. I remember her having to order a replacement once. And I'm not certain I could connect it our new sink faucet. Probably can by removing the aerator. Its one of those fancy faucets.

I think the siphon method is the best for me. I plan to buy some flexible clear hose (good stuff) and not use the large vacuum end that is on the one we have. I guess it really boils down to I hate to vacuum........lol
Oh....I would like to see if there are any attchments I could put on the end of the hose designed for tank vacuuming?
Thanks DJ
 

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Hi i noticed u have a 55gal all male mbunas tank…i have heard that all male tanks are mostly done for peacock and hap tank…and for mbunas the typcial ratio of male to female is done…U have done an all male mbuna tank…Does that work out fine? Also wat stocking du u have in that?
My males are getting along great. I should update my tag line or whatever it's called, because I just updated to a 75 gallon tank for the fun of it. They are all fat, happy, and content with each other. Now that I said that, I probably cursed myself! Surprisingly, the ones that look alike or are zebras are the ones getting along the best. But then, my fish have rarely followed the rules. I have an angelfish that always kills recommended tankmates but gets along with fish she shouldn't.

As for stocking, I have one of each species that I could get my hands on when I ordered them. I also added a Tomato Hap, an Obliquiden, and a Firefish when I was told they'd work with mbunas. So far so good. My mbunas are a Rusty, Goldbar, Red Zebra, Magunga, Chilumba, Yellow Acei, Ice Blue zebra, Polit, and Manda. My favorites are the White Lab, Jewel Spot, and Chewere.
 

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It is not unusual for tanks to be trouble free for the first 9 months. Plan on having a trouble-free mix by the time two years have elapsed.
 
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
MaKettle has gone pretty much my way of stocking things😅😜…i mean one of each species i could get my hands on…but mainly peacocks and haps in my case…few mbunas which include the yellow tail acei,white tail acei,zebra,yellow top hongi,petrtilapia chitimba,cynotilapia zebroide jalo reef and a yellow lab as they have been very good for quite some time…Sold off a lot of mbunas which included a trewavasea ob,fuelleborni,soccolofi,albino red top zebra,male kennyi,red cheek tropheus and an enlongatus usisya…to save the trouble that i see will most probably happen in future looking at way things are turning out with them…I currently have abt 57 fishes in my 300G
 

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Im using fine aquarium sand and my clowns don’t leave anything anywhere that shows detritus. I stir it by hand every month or so to curtail any pockets forming but to use a syphon on sand I have not found the need for. When I do stir it, nothing (absolutely nothing) floats up from the sand.
 
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