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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had a stand built for my tank. It is built with 3/4" plywood (it's for a 72x19 110g tank). The stand is 72.5 x 19.5 and the tank that will be sitting on it is made of half inch glass. This means that when the tank is sitting on the stand, there is a quarter inch clearance on the outside but none on the inside (hope that makes sense). Is this okay?
 

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So, if it gets nudged at all there will no longer be inside support at that point? I wouldn't be comfortable with no margin for error. That seems to be a pretty narrow support strip. But, that's just me. Might be fine, and it's certainly not going to be easy to nudge once it's filled with water. I just like the safety factor. Lumber is cheap and so is my time. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That's my feeling too. He was supposed to build it with 1" plywood which would have given me the clearance I would have been comfortable with. The stand got delivered yesterday and I noticed the change. The problem is that this was the one issue (the thickness of the plywood) that I didn't have written in the design I approved. The 1" thickness was discussed verbally only. I fear I might be stuck with it.
 

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well why dont you just glue and screw a frame of 2"x2" timber inside the plywood?
 

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Heck, go to Home Depot and by a sheet of 4'x2' 3/4 ply and glue and screw that in 4" strips.. that gives you more glu'in and screw'in area than a 2x2 and the 3/4 on the inside is plenty of support. Home Depot will cut the strips for you but you'd have to cut the strips into the length you need. just ensure its leave with the current stand so you don't cause pressure on the glass. I don't know your comfort level with tools etc. but I'm confident that pretty much anyone could make this happen. YOU CAN DO IT!! :thumb:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Will1983 said:
well why dont you just glue and screw a frame of 2"x2" timber inside the plywood?
Just to clarify, my concern isn't about the stand being able to support the weight of the tank. It's about the strip the tank sits on being too narrow. Are you thinking that putting 2x2 posts in teh corners would give the corners of the tank more to sit on top of? (not sure I'm explaining myself clearly).
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
BigDaddyK said:
Heck, go to Home Depot and by a sheet of 4'x2' 3/4 ply and glue and screw that in 4" strips.. that gives you more glu'in and screw'in area than a 2x2 and the 3/4 on the inside is plenty of support. Home Depot will cut the strips for you but you'd have to cut the strips into the length you need. just ensure its leave with the current stand so you don't cause pressure on the glass. I don't know your comfort level with tools etc. but I'm confident that pretty much anyone could make this happen. YOU CAN DO IT!! :thumb:
Thanks for the encouragement. I can really use it at the moment. Your suggestion makes sense. I'm going to see if the guy who built it can do this.
 

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zimmy said:
Will1983 said:
well why dont you just glue and screw a frame of 2"x2" timber inside the plywood?
Just to clarify, my concern isn't about the stand being able to support the weight of the tank. It's about the strip the tank sits on being too narrow. Are you thinking that putting 2x2 posts in teh corners would give the corners of the tank more to sit on top of? (not sure I'm explaining myself clearly).
You're exactly right. You need to give the tank more to sit on, structually it's fine.

I'd put the 2x2's in the corners. Then I'd probably run a 3" piece of pine flat around the entire top to trim it out and give the tank something flat to sit on. Mitre the corners of that piece and let it overhang the outside of the plywood by 3/8" or so. Commercial pine stands are often put together this way. You just need to avoid leaving one corner of an added 2x2 up above the plywood edge, or the tank will wobble corner to corner. So, it's going to have to be cut pretty accurately. You want it to fit exactly for support without being too high.
 

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I'd put the 2x2's in the corners. Then I'd probably run a 3" piece of pine flat around the entire top to trim it out and give the tank something flat to sit on. Mitre the corners of that piece and let it overhang the outside of the plywood by 3/8" or so. Commercial pine stands are often put together this way. You just need to avoid leaving one corner of an added 2x2 up above the plywood edge, or the tank will wobble corner to corner. So, it's going to have to be cut pretty accurately. You want it to fit exactly for support without being too high.
I like most of your idea here but I personally wouldn't use pine.. it's a soft wood that tends to warp and twist... under a tank is not where I'd want that happening.

do what you wish thats just an opinion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
prov356 said:
Then I'd probably run a 3" piece of pine flat around the entire top to trim it out and give the tank something flat to sit on. Mitre the corners of that piece and let it overhang the outside of the plywood by 3/8" or so. Commercial pine stands are often put together this way. You just need to avoid leaving one corner of an added 2x2 up above the plywood edge, or the tank will wobble corner to corner. So, it's going to have to be cut pretty accurately. You want it to fit exactly for support without being too high.
The part where I'm worried about the tank theoretically slipping though is not off the outer edge but into the center. The dimensions of the stand are a little larger than the tank. The added wood is need on the inside of the perimeter. Perhaps I'm not understanding your suggestion?

I talked to the builder and have discussed some of the ideas you've all mentioned here with him. He's going to come over later this week to see how he can make this right.

I'd greatly appreciate if you kept the ideas coming though. I want to be able to present him with some clear and precise options.

Thanks.
 

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Quick fix ... place a 3/4" #2 pine - (2 pieces of 1 x 10) - top onnit cut flush with the cabinet. Glue and dowel together then screw to the cabinet.

Wrap the top of the cabinet with 3/4" x 2-1/2" of the cabinet material rabbeted in to fit snugly with the tank and hide the error, after all that is what trim is for. You could have him bead the edge so it looks like it was designed to be there in the first place.

Don't tell anyone and noone will ever know cept us. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
fox said:
Quick fix ... place a 3/4" #2 pine - (2 pieces of 1 x 10) - top onnit cut flush with the cabinet. Glue and dowel together then screw to the cabinet.

Wrap the top of the cabinet with 3/4" x 2-1/2" of the cabinet material rabbeted in to fit snugly with the tank and hide the error, after all that is what trim is for. You could have him bead the edge so it looks like it was designed to be there in the first place.

Don't tell anyone and noone will ever know cept us. :)
Any chance you post a drawing of what you mean? This stuff is like a foreign language to me :(
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Just to give more detail of the design:



The measurements are not accurate. Where it says 3" it's actually 4." The 4" beams are made of two sheets of 3/4" plywood.

Here's a photo of the area in question.

 

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Does the tank sit on top of the 3/4" sides as you stated in the first post? Or does it sit in the recess in the second pic you just posted.

If it sits on top then what I posted will solve your problem , keep in mind it will raise your tank 3/4". You carpenter can rabbet 1/4" material out of the Trim board so it sits flush with the tank and covers the new top then finish it using the same finish used on the cabinet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The tank sits on the 3/4" side.

I was thinking further about how to solve this problem. Would a 3/4" strip of plywood, that's exactly the width of the recess, fixed along the inner edges of the lip do the trick? I'm thinking it would be sufficient because the strips along the long edges would be resting directly above the plywood beams in the middle that go to the floor. Along the short edges they wouldn't have this support beneath but maybe they aren't even necessary there.

It's a simple solution but as long as the strips are perfectly flush with the 3/4" sides it should work. It also has the benefit of not raising the stand height or the appearance of the stand.

Any feedback would be welcome.
 

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I like most of your idea here but I personally wouldn't use pine.. it's a soft wood that tends to warp and twist... under a tank is not where I'd want that happening.
Pine is used on most commercial stands just as I described. It's not going to warp and twist further once fully cured, particularly attached to the supporting frame while under load.

Just have him trim out the top, so the tank has a bit more support and you'll be fine. That'll distribute the weight across the edge of the plywood better.

Just my .02
 

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I think the guy who made the stand meant for the tank to sit "in" the stand on that flat top in the pic. You should just be able to take a router to the inside of the top lip to make the tank sit down in the stand. He basicly made the stand just a little to small for the tank to sit in properly.
 

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It does look like the carpenter thought the tank would sit "in" the top rather than on it.

I'm no carpenter my self, but why not get a sheet of ply wood and fasten it "in" the top (flush with the outside "rim") and the taak should sit on it like it was completely flat across the whole stand?
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I can see why it might appear that he meant for the tank to sit in the recessed part of the stand but that is not the case. We had lots of discussion about the stand and he was clear that it needs to sit on the perimeter. In my conversations with the builder since the stand was delivered he's also clearly understood the problem of the perimeter not being wide enough to allow for a margin of error when the tank sits on the perimeter.

BoilerFan said:
I'm no carpenter my self, but why not get a sheet of ply wood and fasten it "in" the top (flush with the outside "rim") and the taak should sit on it like it was completely flat across the whole stand?
This could be an option. I'll definitely discuss it with him.

With plywood stands having the perimeter supporting the tank is obviously the best way of maximizing the support for the tank. Is the reason they are usually left with an open top just to save on material? In the case of my stand I believe it's there to further enhance the structural integrity.
 

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could you not just get a piece of plywood the same dimensions of your tank bottom and just put it directly on top of your stand?
 
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