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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is kind of a sequel to a previous post. I have a 72 gallon tank that had 2 gold severums. After
one of my severums would hide in plants and in corners, not even coming out to eat, I was sure he was sick. Sure enough, after a few days, he got Ich. I raised the temperature to 86F/30C and treated with some Ich medication. Shortly, his Ich went away and no one died. I brought the temp back down to 79F/26C. Despite the Ich going away, this fish still acted weird for weeks, which prompted me to post about it to no avail. He died a day or two after I posted. I thought that was the end of it. Now, a few weeks after, my other severum is acting the same. No Ich, though it is now hiding and acting weird. New symptoms showed up, however, and this one now trembles or shakes almost aggressively every few minutes, and it has a string of poop hanging out of it. The poop is mucus-y/slimy, mostly clear but has a lot of green on it too. It has been hanging out for the past 20-30 minutes. However, it still eats like normal. It’s probably my most gastronomically curious fish, it eats like everything. Even tries to eat my finger when I put it in the tank. So, it certainly is not having a lack of diet, but I’m not sure what’s wrong.

Unfortunately, as if I’m not having enough fish problems, my 72 gallon is suddenly leaking, so I had to move the fish to a 20 gallon tank. However, the parameters are: 7.0 pH, 0 ammonia/nitrite, and around 20ppm nitrate. Temperature is at 79F/26C. I mostly feed my fish bloodworm cubes, brine shrimp cubes, and New-Life Spectrum garlic pellets, alternating between the 3 with no feedings on Wednesdays or Sundays. I should hopefully have the fish back in their tank in 2-3 days. The tank is populated with:
2 Discus, 3 Pearl Gouramis, 1 Blue Gourami, 5 Angelfish, 1 Gold Severum, 6 Shwartz Corys, 3 Mystery Snails, 2 Plecos (species unknown)

I attached a photo of the Severum’s hanging poop.

NOTE: This is a post transfer from the fishlore forum, I got no replies overnight so I’m trying here. The Severum’s poop is still hanging, and while no other fish were previously affected, the Blue Gourami also has hanging poop now. It looks about the same as the Severum’s.
 

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This sounds like you have an infection in the gastro-intestinal tracts of your fish. Fortunately, your fish are eating. So, getting the medication needed to treat the infection will be enormously more viable/effective when administered through feeding.
This thread will provide some info about the process.

Bloat Cure | Cichlid Fish Forum (cichlid-forum.com)

The medication referred to in the information thread is called 'Clout', which will work. But, (as mentioned in the thread) 'Clout' is interchangeable with Metronidazole to treat intestinal problems.
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NOTE: Your 72 gallon aquarium is over-stocked. As it is possibly being used now as a 'grow-out' tank? This won't be as much of a problem as things will become, once the adult sizes of your Cichlids are attained. A LOT of aliments, diseases and problems with fish can definitely be caused by over-crowded conditions in the aquarium(s) they are kept in.
 

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This sounds like you have an infection in the gastro-intestinal tracts of your fish. Fortunately, your fish are eating. So, getting the medication needed to treat the infection will be enormously more viable/effective when administered through feeding.
This thread will provide some info about the process.

Bloat Cure | Cichlid Fish Forum (cichlid-forum.com)

The medication referred to in the information thread is called 'Clout', which will work. But, (as mentioned in the thread) 'Clout' is interchangeable with Metronidazole to treat intestinal problems.
-
NOTE: Your 72 gallon aquarium is over-stocked. As it is possibly being used now as a 'grow-out' tank? This won't be as much of a problem as things will become, once the adult sizes of your Cichlids are attained. A LOT of aliments, diseases and problems with fish can definitely be caused by over-crowded conditions in the aquarium(s) they are kept in.
Something I learned over many years and many Severum is that they do best with a substantial amount of aquatic veg in their diet. Not quite to the strictly herbivorous level, but lots is best. If these cubes you use are frozen, nutrition is minimal. Moisture content is high in frozen feed. Hopefully the fish recover, absolutely address the over stock, change diet and I believe overall health will improve
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Something I learned over many years and many Severum is that they do best with a substantial amount of aquatic veg in their diet. Not quite to the strictly herbivorous level, but lots is best. If these cubes you use are frozen, nutrition is minimal. Moisture content is high in frozen feed. Hopefully the fish recover, absolutely address the over stock, change diet and I believe overall health will improve
This sounds like you have an infection in the gastro-intestinal tracts of your fish. Fortunately, your fish are eating. So, getting the medication needed to treat the infection will be enormously more viable/effective when administered through feeding.
This thread will provide some info about the process.

Bloat Cure | Cichlid Fish Forum (cichlid-forum.com)

The medication referred to in the information thread is called 'Clout', which will work. But, (as mentioned in the thread) 'Clout' is interchangeable with Metronidazole to treat intestinal problems.
-
NOTE: Your 72 gallon aquarium is over-stocked. As it is possibly being used now as a 'grow-out' tank? This won't be as much of a problem as things will become, once the adult sizes of your Cichlids are attained. A LOT of aliments, diseases and problems with fish can definitely be caused by over-crowded conditions in the aquarium(s) they are kept in.
I will look into clout treatment, I have some metronidazole I can treat the tank with. I’ll also see about getting medicated pellets.

Youll both be happy to know, though, that I’m replacing the 72 gallon with a 125 gallon. I think at this point it would not be overstocked still, right?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Something I learned over many years and many Severum is that they do best with a substantial amount of aquatic veg in their diet. Not quite to the strictly herbivorous level, but lots is best. If these cubes you use are frozen, nutrition is minimal. Moisture content is high in frozen feed. Hopefully the fish recover, absolutely address the over stock, change diet and I believe overall health will improve
I’m not very educated on the nutritional content of frozen foods, but I mostly use the cubes as a supplement because the gouramis and discus tend to color up more in my tank when I give them varied foods. The severum just happens to be the most aggressive eater in the tank and eats their food too. However, I don’t feed them every day because I’ve had a few fish die from what seems to be swim bladder issues due to over feeding. The fish eat all the plants in the tank, which paired with the food I feed them, leads to digestion issues if I feed too much. The severum has eaten god knows how many of my plants. I don’t know if this is enough of a vegetation supplement, though.
 

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DON'T treat the tank with your Metronidazole medication. In order for it to work properly, you definitely need to treat the food your fish eat with it. It's administered internally. One of the best food to pre-treat with Metronidazole, is with pellet food. Just soak the pellets down in a little bowl with some tank water and the Metronidazole mixed into it. The pellets will soak up the medication, your fish will eat the pellets, and there you have it then - the treatment process is begun!
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And yes, the only way I know of that you can keep live, aquatic plants with Severum is to place the plants in a REFUGIUM out of the tank or something, where the Severum can't reach them! Your Severum are one Cichlid species that definitely will appreciate more veggie-based foods in its diet. Pellets with spirulina content, fresh peeled peas, nori sheets. Yep, all of the usual stuff will be good for that Cichlid species. :)
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The 125 gallon tank is gonna be a breath of fresh air for your fish going into it! Some of them (Pearl Gouramis for sure) should probably be placed in a calmer, smaller tank for their own safety.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
DON'T treat the tank with your Metronidazole medication. In order for it to work properly, you definitely need to treat the food your fish eat with it. It's administered internally. One of the best food to pre-treat with Metronidazole, is with pellet food. Just soak the pellets down in a little bowl with some tank water and the Metronidazole mixed into it. The pellets will soak up the medication, your fish will eat the pellets, and there you have it then - the treatment process is begun!
-
And yes, the only way I know of that you can keep live, aquatic plants with Severum is to place the plants in a REFUGIUM out of the tank or something, where the Severum can't reach them! Your Severum are one Cichlid species that definitely will appreciate more veggie-based foods in its diet. Pellets with spirulina content, fresh peeled peas, nori sheets. Yep, all of the usual stuff will be good for that Cichlid species. :)
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The 125 gallon tank is gonna be a breath of fresh air for your fish going into it! Some of them (Pearl Gouramis for sure) should probably be placed in a calmer, smaller tank for their own safety.
I made the mistake of administering the metroplex to the tank itself, but that’s alright since I was planning on doing a big water change anyways. I bought some omega-one veggie pellets, I can medicate the food but how should I do so? Meaning, I understand that I can just mix a bit of tank water with metroplex in a separate bowl and soak the pellets, but for how long and what amount of metroplex should i put in the water (any specific ratios?)?
 

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A consistent/precise dose of Metronidazole is probably NOT gonna happen when treating pellet food. Just way too many variables involved to get very precise with this thing. I mean really... you think that Severum is just gonna swallow a pill for you? On command?!!!
Nope.
So, here is info from a Discus site on treating pellet food with Metronidazole

4.1.2.2 Dosage in food

• Mixing

The mixing of medicated food is of vital importance - the preferred method is to mortar and pestle the tablet, 'grind it with the end of a wooden rolling pin; then roll out the food, on some grease proof paper, so that it is thin and flat. Then sprinkle the powder thinly and evenly over the food and knead it in. The mix is then rolled up and placed into mixing bowel where it is very carefully mixed so that an even distribution of the drug is assured.

• Dosage

□ The preferred dose is (Francis-Floyd & Reed, 1994; Yeng, 2001) i.e. 1gm of metronidazole to 100gm of Fred's beef heart mix or similar.

□ Again I have increased this dose considerably where warranted When preparing a medicated mix, it is important to use appropriate amounts as there is a life expectancy once the drug has been added to the food.

□ The medicated food, if stored should be frozen

• Feeding the medicated food

□ Some suggest that normal feeding 3x day for 3 days is the best way. A recommended alternative is small portions throughout the day, ensuring that all of the food is eaten i.e. it should not remain on the bottom after a minute or two. This can continue for up to 10 days
-------
Full article is found here,

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And.... awesomely enough - the original posting link is found here,


Oh yeah.... that's 'Super Moderator', DJRANSOME of C-f - delivering the goods!
I've got just a couple I can add to that for you,
  • Visible improvement in the health of your fish does NOT indicate termination of treatment! Nope. Esp. with that very sick Severum of yours. I'm recommending a minimum treatment period of 12-14 days. Continuous, every day.
  • The treatment shown in the links is for HITH. But, will indicate and be performed exactly the same with any internal, feeding treatment of Metronidazole.
  • The most important thing is to get that medication into the intestinal tract(s) of your sick fish. They will NOT overdose or possibly 'spontaneously explode' or something, if this thing is not done, exactly, precisely correct. Just prepare, feed, and get ready to do it all over again. And again.... 12 - 14 days continuous treatment!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
A consistent/precise dose of Metronidazole is probably NOT gonna happen when treating pellet food. Just way too many variables involved to get very precise with this thing. I mean really... you think that Severum is just gonna swallow a pill for you? On command?!!!
Nope.
So, here is info from a Discus site on treating pellet food with Metronidazole

4.1.2.2 Dosage in food

• Mixing

The mixing of medicated food is of vital importance - the preferred method is to mortar and pestle the tablet, 'grind it with the end of a wooden rolling pin; then roll out the food, on some grease proof paper, so that it is thin and flat. Then sprinkle the powder thinly and evenly over the food and knead it in. The mix is then rolled up and placed into mixing bowel where it is very carefully mixed so that an even distribution of the drug is assured.

• Dosage

□ The preferred dose is (Francis-Floyd & Reed, 1994; Yeng, 2001) i.e. 1gm of metronidazole to 100gm of Fred's beef heart mix or similar.

□ Again I have increased this dose considerably where warranted When preparing a medicated mix, it is important to use appropriate amounts as there is a life expectancy once the drug has been added to the food.

□ The medicated food, if stored should be frozen

• Feeding the medicated food

□ Some suggest that normal feeding 3x day for 3 days is the best way. A recommended alternative is small portions throughout the day, ensuring that all of the food is eaten i.e. it should not remain on the bottom after a minute or two. This can continue for up to 10 days
-------
Full article is found here,

-
-
And.... awesomely enough - the original posting link is found here,


Oh yeah.... that's 'Super Moderator', DJRANSOME of C-f - delivering the goods!
I've got just a couple I can add to that for you,
  • Visible improvement in the health of your fish does NOT indicate termination of treatment! Nope. Esp. with that very sick Severum of yours. I'm recommending a minimum treatment period of 12-14 days. Continuous, every day.
  • The treatment shown in the links is for HITH. But, will indicate and be performed exactly the same with any internal, feeding treatment of Metronidazole.
  • The most important thing is to get that medication into the intestinal tract(s) of your sick fish. They will NOT overdose or possibly 'spontaneously explode' or something, if this thing is not done, exactly, precisely correct. Just prepare, feed, and get ready to do it all over again. And again.... 12 - 14 days continuous treatment!
Got it. I don’t have Fred’s beef heart mix and looking at videos online to make a beef heart mix seems kind of complicated with tools I don’t have. What do you think about this? https://kensfish.com/products/kens-premium-metronidazole-garlic-flake

I can feed the fish this stuff 12-14 days no problem, I just need to know how to cost-and-time-effectively get the metronidazole into the food. Im also concerned about the beef heart mix because feeding the fish 3x a day for almost 2 weeks just pure meat every day seems like it could cause some serious blockage issues. I mean I’ve heard feeding too many bloodworms a week can do so, I can’t even imagine 3x a day. The Ken's metro-garlic flakes seem to be spirulina-based, so at least constipation or blockage is unlikely, right?
 

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You're overthinking this.
To inform, I've never fed ANYTHING with beef heart before in my life!
But, I have used dry, veggie-based pellet food that was reconstituted in Metronidazole infused water. Just put those pellets in the prepared medication water bowl dry, and they'll soak up the medication just fine. Then, when they become soft and pliable - serve 'em up!
C'mon... maintaining 12-14 days of this thing had better be pretty easy to do, right? ;)
 
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