Cichlid Fish Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys.

Im new on here, my name is Luke and im from Sydney Australia.
I currently have a 30G tall tetra tank and im looking to go one bigger.

I'm looking to start planning my next tank. I know the wife won't let me get it any time soon so hopefully if I start planning I can build it up by Christmas if I am lucky.
I'm hoping to build a 5*2*2 tank (6foot if I am lucky enough) which will start as a freshwater but with the opportunity to convert to salt water later on down the track.
I'm hoping I can get some information from you guys to fill in the gaps.

Tank goal:
Lots of bright active fish, relatively low maintenance tank, budget -mid range cost

Stocking:
I am thinking of a hap and peacock tank with a few clown loaches in there.
Possibly adding in some smaller schooling fish for some more activity.
Snails or pleco to assist in the low-maintenance aspect.
What numbers of stocking would be appropriate?

Filtration:
I dont mind building a sump for this tank. As its a new tank i can have the tank drilled. If i go for a sump,what size would be appropriate and what return pump would be recommended?
Or i can go down the easy route with 1 or 2 Susun 304B's (i was also considering AC110's but i dont want to have to bring the tank forward due to them being at the back)

Cheers
Luke
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
I've been keeping haps & peacocks about 5 months now, I have a 6x2x2 180gal and a 8x3x2.5 450gal both have haps & peacocks. Both tanks are acrylic drilled w/sumps.

180gal: seventeen 3"-4" fish, 30gal sump, 1100gph pump. NOTE: I find a larger sump would've worked better as the flow through it is too fast, though the return pump provides adequate flow inside the tank so I believe the gph is adequate.

450gal: forty-five 3" haps & peacocks, 100gal sump, 3000gph pump. NOTE: the sump size & return pump works really well with this tank.

I personally like to keep to the approximate 10gal per fish stocking. Anything more and it gets crowded imo and maintenance also increases.

HTH
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
40,531 Posts
18 adults <= 6" works for a 72" tank. Stock by length, not gallons.

The usual schooling fish do not work with haps and peacocks, what did you have in mind? You might want fewer haps/peacocks if the schooling fish are a priority.

I like canisters and I use two for most of my tanks, including the 72" tank.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the input guys.
The schooling fish aren't the priority, it was just an afterthought to add something different to the tank.

If I also wanted to add the clown loaches, what sort of numbers would be best there.

Also what amount of heating would be recommended for that size tank?

Ken. I would love to see a photo of your 450gal
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,129 Posts
Welcome to the forum, and nice to see somebody else from Down Under here. ;-)

Since you are still in the very early planning stage, for lots of color and activity I would also not count out mbuna. They are not exactly schooling, but there is a lot of interaction in their colonies. They don't go all that well with the rest of your stocking list though. If so, it would be best to go all the way mbuna. Just a thought to throw in there.

Regarding the sump, the bigger the better. If the sump is the size of a canister, you might as well go with the canister, but anything larger is an improvement in my opinion, if only for the extra water volume. Maintenance in my experience is about the same effort, but of course it is a lot easier to buy a canister off the shelf and hook it up than building a sump from scratch. I have been building on my current sump system for months, but it is a very unusual set up with the sump above the tank. I'll post details if I ever get it to work. ;-)

Details about a more traditional sump setup are on my website: http://www.fmueller.com/home/aquaristic ... iltration/

In our parts Jebao pumps seem to be quite well respected, but I haven't got mine running yet.

Regarding heating, a lot depends on the outside temperature. Considering that it never gets really cold in Sydney, I'd say a 300W heater should be a good fit for your tank.

On the clown loaches, personally I do not like combining them with cichlids, but of course many people do it without problems. The are actually kind of a schooling fish and prefer to be in groups - maybe six for a tank your size? They get enormous in old age, but in most tanks they never seem to get old enough to reach full size.

Finally, for low maintenance, nothing beats an automatic water change system. It's easy to install in a sump: http://www.fmueller.com/home/aquaristic ... wc-system/

But it can also be done with canisters: http://www.fmueller.com/home/aquaristic ... wc-system/

Best of luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for that information Frank, that post was very informative.
I see that a sump size of 25% of the display tank is a good target to achieve, is this the running water volume within the sump or the total sump size (including power outage flooding)
If i go 5*2*2, a sump of 36*18*18 inches gives 170L which looks like a good size.

I havent heard of those Jebao pumps but a quick google show they are highly regarded and very well priced. Would the 7000l/hr be a good number (after 1.5m height it should give around 4500l/hr) or is it worth spending the extra $10 for the larger 9000 and dial it down as needed.

As for mbuna vs peacock and haps, next time im at the aquarium ill have a bit of a look and see what i like better .

Ill be having a look at some of your links later on to get some info about the automatic water changer :)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,129 Posts
I basically did not leave any space for power outage flooding. The sump needs an overflow anyhow for the automatic water change system, and I made this overflow large enough that excess water in case of a power outage could simply go down the drain. When the pump starts running again, the water level in the sump sinks a little, but it is filled up again by the water change system in a couple of days. I am a great proponent of having as much water as possible, so I like to see a nice full sump. ;-)

The Jebao pumps you can regulate down somewhat. I bought the largest one on the market - I forget what the model is called - and it turned out to be a mistake. I could not regulate it down enough so my drain pipes could cope. I had to buy a smaller pump. :oops:

I will say though that my drain pipes allow a lot less flow than I thought, because they are horizontal, not vertical. Turns out that makes a huge difference!
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top