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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello!

I have a ~67G tank with 12 subadult Trophies duboisi "Halembe" as well as a colony of Neolamprologus similis. It's been running about 16 months. I purchased the Trophs at 1" and have never had any issues with them. Two months ago I started seeing the first signs of breeding behaviour so I don't think it will be too much longer before I have holding females :D The similis have absolutely thrived; they've bred to the point that I'm going to be selling some juveniles/subadults at the local fish society auction this month. I started with four, and now I have somewhere between 20-30, plus all the most recent fry.

I've noticed that since the Trophs started doing the breeding dance, the similis have changed their behaviour (hiding in shells more, the fry are more spooky) so I figure it's time to separate. While the similis seem to be reacting to the Tropheus, the Tropheus don't even notice the similis; they squabble a bit amoung themselves now and again but I've never even seen a ripped fin on any fish in that tank. They ignore the tiny fry: I've seen my big dominant male Troph swim right past a cloud of fry without a second look. He even doesn't seem to notice when the dominant male similis tries to bite him for blundering too close to the shells; no retribution, he just continues on his way like nothing happened. I always intended this set up to be a grow-out for the tiny Tropheus, which are now around 3.5-4" with the largest male is a bit over 4". I have a 150G tank just resealed that I plan on using for the Trophs. The similis I plan on keeping in the 65G.

These are my first Tanganyikan cichlids, so I figured I'd check my stocking lists :)

150G: 60x24x24
12x Tropheus duboisi (I vented them two months ago and it appears I have 2:10, but there was one I was not 100% on so could be 3:9 though the third "possible male" is the smallest)
1:1 Eretmodus cyanostictus (purchase 6, down to a pair hopefully, unless they all kill each other...)
1:1 Juliedochromis marksmithi (purchase 6, down to one pair)
(Maybe 6-8 Synodontis lucipinnis?)
(Maybe 1:1 Xenotilapia papilio?) I don't know how well Xenotilapia would handle Tropheus energy...

67G: 48x18x18
Colony of Neolamprologus similis
12x Cyprichromis leptosoma, or maybe Paracyprichromis nigripinnis though I prefer the swimming pattern of C. leptosoma
(Maybe 1:1 Xenotilapia papilio, if not in the 150?) I'm not sure that 48" is enough for shelldwellers and sand dwellers, though.

I'm also interested in Lamprichthys tanganicanus, but I'm not sure if they would fit in either tank comfortably. I'm not looking to cram as many fish as I can into the tanks. I don't mind taking a mild risk- my partner and I have a bunch other tanks running and stored, so finding space for something isn't usually an issue- but I'd like to avoid and obvious conflicts etc.
 

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Definite no on the Papilios and Trophs from me bud. Very delicate and very expensive fish that need carefully chosen tankmates. ie: Paracyps, tricoti etc.
I'm not sure about papilios with similis as I have never tried it but I do keep papilios , cyps and paracyps together in a 210g tank.
P.S, if you locate some xeno papilio kanoni, please let me know. They're as rare as rocking horse poo around here.
 

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Congrats on your Tropheus duboisi "Halembe. I bought 21 in March in the 1.25-1.75 inch range. My estimate was that in 6 months they would be breeding. In two weeks it will be six months so we shall see. I too, am seeing breeding habits/activity but do not think any females are holding - I have no idea of the ratio M/F. I have had tropheus before but not the duboisi. Mine are in a 90 gallon tank with no other fish. I try to keep breeding tanks as only breeding tanks, usually with no other types of fish so I really cannot comment on your combination. Were your tropheus hard to find?
 

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Your 150 G stocking looks good. Get the décor and the feeding right and all should be fine.
I have kept duboisi with julies (marlieri) and cyanostictus and it worked well. Plenty of breeding activity by both the dubs and the marlieri (to the extent that the tank eventually got over-run), who basically ignored each other. I would tend to agree that the Papilio would probably not work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Whelp, never mind getting new fish.

My partner's guppy tank came down with camallanus on Saturday. I was immediately thankful that we have separate fish nets and buckets etc for all our tanks... until I expressed that to him, and he went sheet-white. Apparently he didn't think it was really important, and has been exchanging the buckets, hoses, etc between the tanks on his turn to do water changes. He thought I was just being paranoid. So... in all probability my beloved Tanganyikan tank has (as yet asymptomatic) camallanus as well. We are treating everything with Levamisole, but we won't be getting any more fish for at least 6-12 months while we quarantine our stock to ensure we don't infect new fish. The worms are bad, but the treatment for them is harsh too, so I'm just praying my colonies pull through. Never mind my collection of endangered goodeids, and other species! Ugh.

I was going to sell some fish at the auction next week, and BAP some species as well for the first time! I'm very glad the symptoms appeared before we sold any fish, but not having sick fish at all would have been far preferable. I'm so careful with my fish: 16 week quarantine, dewormer, the whole works. I'm extremely frustrated!
 
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