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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys,

Got these two Zebras from someone, he told me they are both females. After analyzing the one in the first picture further, I noticed a totally different mouth shape compared to my other zebras, as well as its color being pink-ish, rather than the normal orange. Second one I think it's a male, due to the fact it has a lot of bruises and it has more and bigger egg spots than my other females. Opinions? :)

First:
20180218_172352.jpg


Possible male?
20180218_114914.jpg


PS: The first one is the one being aggressively chased around by my "tank boss", the big male zebra.

 

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The mature males do turn more of a peach color. Why is he lurking under the surface?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Just got her (that's what I was told, even confirmed it had fry) and the very aggressive tank boss (male zebra) was chasing her around the tank. Even though I have plenty of hiding spaces in the rocks, all fish that are chased around seem to only find refuge near the surface, behind the filter intakes, but rarely in the caves in the rocks.
 

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That means they are being overly harassed. Maybe you need to remove the male?

There are albino zebras...maybe she has some albino parentage, which could also mean hybrid.
 

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alexx88 said:
Just got her (that's what I was told, even confirmed it had fry) and the very aggressive tank boss (male zebra) was chasing her around the tank. Even though I have plenty of hiding spaces in the rocks, all fish that are chased around seem to only find refuge near the surface, behind the filter intakes, but rarely in the caves in the rocks.
I would double or triple the rocks making as many hidey holes as possible; fish hiding behind filter intakes/outputs or hanging at the surface are highly stressed from being chased.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the advice. It's my first case of aggression at this level (only had intermittent "hide behind the filter intake" before). I have another female zebra in another tank (purchased her along with the other two fish, do you think it would be a good idea to move her into the main tank as well, to try to curb the male's aggression? BTW, the one lurking underneath the surface is surely a female, the guy who gave it to me assured me he took eggs out of her mouth just a few weeks ago.

Anyway, to sum it up, I have a spare tank, how can I use it to manage the main one and what should I do in the long run?

Thanks all!
 

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alexx88 said:
Thanks for the advice. It's my first case of aggression at this level (only had intermittent "hide behind the filter intake" before). I have another female zebra in another tank (purchased her along with the other two fish, do you think it would be a good idea to move her into the main tank as well, to try to curb the male's aggression? BTW, the one lurking underneath the surface is surely a female, the guy who gave it to me assured me he took eggs out of her mouth just a few weeks ago.

Anyway, to sum it up, I have a spare tank, how can I use it to manage the main one and what should I do in the long run?

Thanks all!
I would add more rocks, make more hiding places and try all the fish together again. I keep my Mbuna tank filled with rocks front to back, end to end and about half way to the top. Makes it harder to vacuum, but the fish appreciate it. There may be one less aggressive fish up near the surface occasionally, but the aggressive ones will chase them enough that they head for the safety of the rocks pretty quick. Don't get me wrong, it's not like there are fish I never see or fish getting beat on daily; for the most part they are all out and about, just occasionally it gets rowdy and the chase is on!

There are 12 adult Mbuna in this tank, as well as 8 juvenile Red Zebras and 2 adult Synodontis Nigritis. Not the best image, but you get the idea:
 

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Assuming this is a 48x18 tank or larger...I would remove the aggressive male zebra and add red zebra females until you have 4 or more of them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
It's only a 40" unfortunately :( As I said on the other thread, the solution I'm moving towards is donating the entire zebra family as being too aggressive and unsuited to my tank size.

@Old Newbie: Wow! That's a lot of rocks there! :) How are you managing detritus, do you remove the rocks for vacuuming or only do the clear patches of sand?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
By the way, I've removed the tank boss and put him into a smaller tank. Now, with the path to leadership cleared, the once sub-dominant zebra male is doing almost the same things as the old tank boss. Some things never change... :)
 

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40" is too short, as you've found out, for Estherae. I've never heard of a female adopting the male peachy color.

The tank is also too small for the C. Moorii. But congrats on the holding female.
 
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