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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i now have a 20g bow which i had for a grow out but currently do not have anymore fry. i got a second 75g and moved them all up. so now i have this tank that is running but no fish. i wanted to know what would be a good fish for this size tank. single species preferred but not absolute. it is taller than wider. dim... 22"front curve x 9" x 18" (20" on back) it is a pretty new tank and i would like to use it before i think about getting rid of it.

i do plan on breeding more but will get more 10gs or 20g L for fry. this tank is not suited well for larger numbers of fry.

i was thinking maybe some blue rams but not sure if the footprint is big enough for more than 1 pair. i prefer cichlids but have open ears. 8)

so what you think.... :popcorn:
 

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When I've seen blue rams sell at auction, they went quite high.
If you have soft enough water, a pair would be beautiful in a bowfront!
I found this article on liveaquaria.com
The German Blue Ram is prized for its winning personality despite its fierce appearance. With its spiked dorsal fin, low-slung pectoral fins, and mottled deep blue splotches of color, Papiliochromis ramirezi appears to be an aquarium bulldog. However, this member of the Cichlidae family is actually one of the more social and peaceful freshwater fish. In fact, most German Blue Rams will actively swim with equally non-aggressive members of your community aquarium and are known to faithfully pair with just one other mate.
For the best care, the German Blue Ram should be kept in an aquarium of at least 20 gallons with several dense plant groups scattered around plenty of open swimming space. The German Blue Ram also needs a few caves in which to hide and, if breeding, flat stones on which the female can lay her eggs. Though the German Blue Ram is very peaceful, both females and males can become aggressive towards other fish when hiding places are lacking or when tending to their eggs.

Impeccable water quality is also a must. The German Blue Ram breeds in soft to medium hard water with a neutral pH and slightly raised water temperatures between 77° and 82°F. Peat should be added to the water. Both the male and female share the rearing of the fry, and it has been reported that the German Blue Ram will take fry into their mouths to protect them like a mouth brooder. Care should be taken so that the fry are not sucked into the filter.
Bolivian Rams are more forgiving to higher pH than blue rams,
(you can find them in cichlid_forum profiles under southamerican dwarfs "mikrogeophaqus altispinosus")
and in your planted bow front, would be purty too.
hth
Alicem
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
i had a pair of Bolivian rams. but the male has past on. so i now have a lone female. also i can get blue rams that have been several gen in hard water(ph 7.6 and up). so the soft water is not a problem. just the space.

could i fit 2 or more pairs in there??

or should i look to multis or gold occ.??
 
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