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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hi! i was hoping to get some advice/answers/help with this guy. I recently ordered this yellow fin mbamba from an online cichlid shop. Once I got him situated in my take i noticed he had black spots on his face and body. i immediately took him out and put him in a quarantine tank, where i kept him for a few days. when i looked at him today it looked like all the spots had cleared up, but when i added him back to my main tank it looked like all of the spots had returned or they just never actually went away. i immediately took him out again and put him back in the quarantine tank. reading things online all i could really find was black spot disease. once i first noticed the spots i immediately emailed the place i ordered from, where they told me they’ve seen it before, it’s not contagious, and it should clear up on its own in a few days. it’s been a few days and he’s been quarantined, but the spots are still here. none of my other cichlids in my main tank have any black spots on them at all, which makes me question if it really is black spot disease, because i’ve read that black spot disease is highly contagious. my water parameters are all great, so i can’t see it being a water issue, especially because none of my other cichlids are affected by this. does anybody have any idea what this could be? thanks in advance

Fin Underwater Fish Marine biology Water
Water Vertebrate Plant Organism Fin
 

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Your fish looks like it has been infected with freshwater Flukes. Not surprising, as most African Cichlids purchased out of the LFS have been farm raised in these rather large, open air vat/trough things in Florida. Access to an almost unlimited supply of fresh water makes growing out African Cichlids in those conditions, highly profitable.
Unfortunately, it also provides conditions suitable for sustaining the freshwater Fluke, which requires a fish host, a snail and even a bird to undergo a full life-cycle. :oops:
More info here:


Best treatment for this (mostly harmless) condition, is what you are doing now in quarantining affected fish. Adding 3 teaspoons per gallon of non-iodized table salt to the quarantine tank water, and raising temps up to 81 - 82 degrees Fahrenheit (parasite life cycle accelerant), should have things resolved within 4 weeks for your affected fish. Though I would sustain quarantine for a full six weeks, to observe and treat for any other problems.
NOTE: Your fish may exhibit some wound scarring or other indicators of the Fluke infestation, after successful quarantine. This does not indicate future susceptibility to later, potential re-infection.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
ah this is bad news to hear for me🙁 i went to my LFS since i hadn’t gotten a response, and they told me is was due to stress and i should put him back into the main tank as being quarantined might be adding to this stress… Is it too late for my other fish now? Should i treat my entire main tank?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Your fish looks like it has been infected with freshwater Flukes. Not surprising, as most African Cichlids purchased out of the LFS have been farm raised in these rather large, open air vat/trough things in Florida. Access to an almost unlimited supply of fresh water makes growing out African Cichlids in those conditions, highly profitable.
Unfortunately, it also provides conditions suitable for sustaining the freshwater Fluke, which requires a fish host, a snail and even a bird to undergo a full life-cycle. :oops:
More info here:


Best treatment for this (mostly harmless) condition, is what you are doing now in quarantining affected fish. Adding 3 teaspoons per gallon of non-iodized table salt to the quarantine tank water, and raising temps up to 81 - 82 degrees Fahrenheit (parasite life cycle accelerant), should have things resolved within 4 weeks for your affected fish. Though I would sustain quarantine for a full six weeks, to observe and treat for any other problems.
NOTE: Your fish may exhibit some wound scarring or other indicators of the Fluke infestation, after successful quarantine. This does not indicate future susceptibility to later, potential re-infection.
ah this is bad news to hear for me🙁 i went to my LFS since i hadn’t gotten a response, and they told me is was due to stress and i should put him back into the main tank as being quarantined might be adding to this stress… Is it too late for my other fish now? Should i treat my entire main tank?
 

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Okay then.... yes, you should now treat the entire tank. Raise water temp up to 81 - 82F and use same recipe of 3 teaspoons per gallon of non-iodized table salt. This will kill the fish flukes, (monogenean trematodes) that may emerge while in the free-swimming stage, and will also help to prevent a lot of other potential problems (such as Ich and some fungus infections) from possibly spreading from infected fish. Salt used like this is a supportive (low) level of treatment, and will not harm healthy, unaffected fish who otherwise would not need any treatment process. Maintain treatment process for 6 weeks and do not discontinue if the affected fish seem to visibly improve or are seemingly 'cured'. Nasty things can often come back from a treatment process, if it is not maintained long enough to ensure complete removal of the organism in all stages of it's parasitic life cycle.
Definitely maintain or even increase the periodicity and percentage of water changes for the aquarium, while continuing salt treatment. You might be surprised at how effective clean water conditions in an aquarium can be, in boosting immune systems and strengthening your fish's health. :)
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So, in moving forward..... it is recommended that ALL new living occupants (that means plants, anything!) introduced to an existing aquarium, should be quarantined for up to six weeks to observe for infections or any problems that may emerge before stocking in the larger/main tank. That will help a lot to keep your other fish safe and it is much easier to treat fish and closely observe potentially sick fish in the smaller quarantine tank - than in your main aquarium. Carefully clean or sterilize non-living things being placed in the aquarium (that even includes fish nets, and other items!). Boil any wood items. Plus, sterilize rocks and any plastic items such as fake plants or decorations with lightly chlorinated water or scrub furnishings like that, with hot water and Oxy-Clean.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Okay, i will get on this treatment. thank you so so much for all your help!!🙂
 
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