Cichlid Fish Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
283 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I do not understand what the **** is going on with my tank. I have a custom 118 gallon and built a DIY wet/dry sump. The tank does not leak and the wet/dry functions exactly as planned. My problem is that my plumbing (rigid PVC) leaks like a sieve.

I don't get it.....I used primer/cleaner and heavy duty pvc glue; inserted and gave 1/4" turn; held joints together; allowed to cure fully.

My drain lines (2) are fine, but my return lines leak like crazy.

The only cause I can think of is that my pump output is 1.5" and I reduced it to 3/4" right off the pump. I am guessing that the flow restriction right at the pump is creating too much pressure for the joints because even one of my pvc unions is leaking above the pump.

Any thoughts??? This is making me crazy! I've plumbed this thing 3 times now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,948 Posts
I'm not sure what's going on? The reducer shouldn't be an issue--with on open ended system like a spray bar etc... on the return, there shouldn't be much 'pressure' to speak of. I'd see about modifying the spray bar (return) to open it up a little more (add some holes) .....

Sometimes it's good to add a short piece of flexible tubing between the pump and the PVC return to absorb any vibrations that might work a union type joint loose--but i can't figure what's making the glue joints leak?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,606 Posts
Some restriction on the return side is good. It reduces problems with cavitation inside the pump. Too much will waste energy and conceivably damage plumbing if the pump is oversize for the system. 1.5" outlet pumps are often for ponds, or they are sump pumps. Sump pumps are not considered continuous service. Tell us more about your pump. Even a Mag 24 pump (2400 gph flow) has only a 1" outlet. Matching flexible pipe from the pump to the tank where it is attached to return nozzles or a spray bar seems like the best way to go. 3/4" pipe has one fourth (not one half) the capacity of 1.5" with more friction, so that is a huge reduction.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,172 Posts
Your pump can't produce enough pressure for the reduction to be the problem. Has to be a problem with materials or methodology. Are you using sure your glue type and pipe type match? Hardware stores sell multipurpose glue that supposedly works on cpvc, pvc, and abs but I don't trust it and always match the glue to the pipe. I have had trouble with old glue as well. For most projects if I'm spending 20 bucks on plumbing I spring the extra 2 bucks for new glue too.

I don't know if any of that applies to you or not, but I definitely don't think your pump is overpowering the capacity of the plumbing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
I have the most simple plumbing i could think of i did not use any glue reducer or tie off's no leaks my pvc simply fit's tight and my sump is under the tank.i would post a pic if i new how.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,172 Posts
dr wethumb said:
I have the most simple plumbing i could think of i did not use any glue reducer or tie off's no leaks my pvc simply fit's tight and my sump is under the tank.i would post a pic if i new how.
how do you not have leaks if you didn't use glue? What's a "tie off"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
My intake and outtake are direcly inside the tank theire is no elbows in the pvc i drilled the bottom of the tank but yours is probably tempered so the water pressure alone held everything in place.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top