Cichlid Fish Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
188 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
picked this up under an erroneous common name. They have Motaguensis and Managuensis also but theyre easy to ID and in separate tanks.
As far as I can tell, Loisellei or Friedrichstahli but which is it ?





I was leaning more towards Loisellei, based on the black markings but I've only ever kept Managuensis in the past.

Thanks!
Rafini
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,111 Posts
Looks to be Parachromis motaguensis . Scale pattern, larger spots on the fins, markings, coloration, body shape and snout are all a fit. In fact with the reddish coloration on the gill plate, I would think it is probably the more commonly available "Red tiger Motaguense" rather then one of the other less commonly available regional variants.
By the way, as a side note, the classification of some of the Parachromis has been changed . What we have known in the hobby as "fredrichstahli" is now Parachromis multifasciatus and what we have known in the hobby as "loisellei" is actually Parachromis fredrichstahlii. (and the term P. loisellei now considered a junior synonym of P. fredrichstahlii
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
188 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thats actually pretty interesting, I had no idea they had switched names. Multifasciatus suits freddy's pretty well.
Its a really nicely colored individual, it did look different than the other Motaguensis at the store but they were slightly larger so I`ll put it down to that.
This particular store has a habit of displaying the same species in different tanks but with common/scientific names almost as if people will believe they are different species.

I wouldn't discount the fact that it could be a red tiger, it wasnt exactly cheap but not overly expensive for a nice cichlid.

Thanks for the ID, are these guys sexually dimorphic like Dovii and Managuensis?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,111 Posts
rafini said:
are these guys sexually dimorphic like Dovii and Managuensis?
Yes, they are dimorphic. Easy to sex at larger sizes, though at the size of your fish, I wouldn't bet either way.
Typical of CA, males are larger and usually end up much deeper bodied. Adult females express the vertical barring much more prominently.Mature, younger males might exhibit the horizontal bar but eventually lose that, as well. Older males might lose all barring ( and blotches) and end up with a honeycomb pattern over their body, with a pattern almost like Nandopsis haitiensis. The Red Tiger Motoguense strain is even easier to sex, as the coloration between sexes can show at a fairly young age. Females have considerably more red and it is a solid color over the gill plate. Males can have varying degrees of red coloration ( from a lot to very little, and even eventually none). The red on the male is not a solid color over the entire gill plate.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top