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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am sure this has been answered 50 million times but I am going to ask anyway. I have heard mixed things about cichlids in a 20g tank so I figured I would ask here. Some people say absolutely not and some people say that there are certain cichlids that can be put in a 20g tank. So what are your thoughts? Can it be done? If so, what kinds can be put in, and how many?

Thank you all for your patience and your time.
 

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Among the Africans, see the 20G cookie cutter tanks. Many Tanganyikans will work. Shellies for one.

What are the dimensions of the 20G?

Welcome to Cichlid-forum!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hey thanks for the reply!

The dimensions are 24" L x 12.5" W x 16" H

My water test results are:
Nitrate 20
Nitrite 0
Hardness 150
Chlorine 0
Alkalinity 120
PH 6.8

Thanks again for your help.
 

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Time for a 50% water change. That is not a LONG 20G so go by the length. Shellies would be a good choice.
 

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What should I be looking at for the tests? I have been reading that the PH should be 8.2? Is that right? What other results are off?
 

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The test kits come with guidelines. Your tap water should have nitrates = 0. Then when you do water changes, you have a chance of getting under 40ppm in your tank. I like to be at 10ppm nitrates after a water change and when I get to 20ppm it's time to change the water.
 

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FirstTime said:
What should I be looking at for the tests? I have been reading that the PH should be 8.2? Is that right? What other results are off?
Don't get too hung up on the pH listed in Species Profiles or in some of the articles. It's more important to have a stable pH for both the tank and with your tap water within reason.

I like to check tap water 2 ways, 1st take a sample of your tap water, check the pH and write the number down then take a sample of your tap water in a clean glass container and let it set out for 24 hours and check the pH again. Hopefully the pH remains stable or similar in results.
 
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