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Hello, I am fairly new to keeping African chiclids. I recently got a good deal on a 40 gallon breeder and from what i hear, this is big enough to keep africans. I think I have decided to keep mbunas over peacocks and haps. I need some suggestions on what kinds of mbunas exactly can go with one another and how many I should get(much of the stuff I read is very confusing). I would like to know If I should keep all males, or some males some females. Also, what do I do if they are not sexed in the store. If anybody can help me out on this and has any other info that would be great!
Thanks!
 

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It is a small tank for mbuna and your options will be very limited. I would do a small, peaceful single species like Chindongo saulosi. They are ideal for a tank like this for 2 reasons: you can fit more than 99% of other species and you get 2 colors since males have blue bars and females are orange/yellow. Buy 18 unsexed juveniles and rehome males as they mature and/or cause trouble until you end up with 3m:9f.

Don't go by gallons, go by length. The typical 40 breeder is 36" long. You would have many more options with a 48" long tank.

It is called a breeder because is it good for raising fry.
 

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treyjansma said:
I would like to know If I should keep all males, or some males some females.
This is a tougher question to answer than it appears. I have an all make tank but often wonder if it is cruel to do so (how would you like to live the rest of your existence with the same gender?). I've had mixed gendered tanks and while it might be the way "nature intended", they can be a pain in the tookis, what with the dominant male(s) flying all around attacking anything that moves and the resulting fry that for the most part get eaten. I think it is a question that only you can answer. One that only you can be comfortable with, and ultimately, one that you have to "live" with. As a result, there is no right answer here, only your answer.
 

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Agree with fish_gazer, I used to have an all-male tank and I changed to mixed gender. Not because it was cruel, but because the fish color up better and can live their whole lives in the tank, more peaceful for the fish keeper. :thumb:

For all-male think in terms of a tank that is 48x18 or larger. Your objectives are key, but stocking fish that can live in harmony in the environment you provide is important as well.
 
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