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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys,

Live in uk, have all male peacock tank at 260lt. Ordered new tank and sump in total will be almost 500 gallons.

I have just made 4 diy reactors for my 260lt, 1 k1 micro, 1 seachem di nitrate, 1 carbon and 1 GFO, they have only been up a week and my intention was to move them to my new tank.

Now heres my advice im needing.

Protein skimmer for freshwater work or not? Reason i ask is that many SW sites recommend you use the reactors then straight into protein skimmer (to remove something, cant remember what tho), what does FW need to make a skimmer work

SW guys do refugiums with chaeto, do we have soemthing similar? Not interested in pathos etc. The sump is holding 120g so i have lots and lots of space, i have designed it that once the water finishes its run thru the man made cycle it travels around the entire sump before getting into the ref, which by this point has slowed the flow down and allows it better to its job.

I enjoy my holidays, i enjoy my fish... I want to be able to go on holiday and have minimal effort on WC as possible... So im gearing and taking time to research as much as i can in order to minimise the amount of maintenance.

I am doing 3 40% water changes just now each week on my 260lt, im heavily, heavily over stocked just now.

Please help!

Thanks
 

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My understanding is that generally protein skimmers don't work as well in freshwater tanks as they do in saltwater tanks though I have seen freshwater success with a PS on another forum. Maybe someone on this forum can offer more suggestions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks,

If im running bio pellets which are great for controlling nitrates however pellets produce carbon source which promotes algae! It seems a vicious circle. If anyone would know that a skimmer would remove the excess produced by the pellets or will it make zero difference.
 

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You are making this way to hard friend, forget about what the salties do :)

With SW you do less WC's so therefore you need help from skimmers and reactors to control nitrate and dose calcium etc. You don't need all that for FW, save your money.

K1 is a good choice, it is all the bio media you will ever need. Be advised though, it will take a significant amount of time to cycle K1 media. I think I waited about 8 weeks before stocking. But once cycled it is maintenance free and produces very little nitrate.

If you are changing that much water, you don't need all that chemical filtration IMO either. You shouldn't have enough nitrate to worry about. Fresh clean water is the best thing to control nitrate (or anything really) in a fresh water aquarium.

Have you looked in to a drip system? Best thing I ever did for aquarium maintenance was add a drip system. I change my mechanical filters and clean my viewing panes weekly and do about a 40% wc every six weeks or so.
 

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If I read correctly your sump has a refugium section. If that is the case then you could put plants in the refugium on a light cycle that is opposite of the main tank that way the plants are producing oxygen while the fish are resting and using up excess fertilizer in the water.
 

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Lee79 said:
You are making this way to hard friend, forget about what the salties do :)

With SW you do less WC's so therefore you need help from skimmers and reactors to control nitrate and dose calcium etc. You don't need all that for FW, save your money.

K1 is a good choice, it is all the bio media you will ever need. Be advised though, it will take a significant amount of time to cycle K1 media. I think I waited about 8 weeks before stocking. But once cycled it is maintenance free and produces very little nitrate.

If you are changing that much water, you don't need all that chemical filtration IMO either. You shouldn't have enough nitrate to worry about. Fresh clean water is the best thing to control nitrate (or anything really) in a fresh water aquarium.

Have you looked in to a drip system? Best thing I ever did for aquarium maintenance was add a drip system. I change my mechanical filters and clean my viewing panes weekly and do about a 40% wc every six weeks or so.
+1. Reef tanks don't like a lot of water change, the corals don't like changes in the water parameters. But FW you can do massive water changes. I change 100-150G on my 210G (water volume with sump) every week, in two or three increments. Nitrates always zero. I change at most 20G per week on my 230G (water volume with sump) reef tank each week, in one increment. You don't need fuge or skimmer on fresh, and they likely won't work anyway. You can always add plants to the FW display tank to provide add'l filtration. Media reactors in the sump are the way to go. On my FW planted I have Purigen, Biomedia, and Biopellets, and occasional GFO (only when needed). The biopellet and GFO reactors are fluidized. Also like the ability to does Seachem ferts in the sump, and run a UV sterilizer down there.
 

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My other thread in this section will describe chaeto vs. algae, but in short, no chaeto for you. A fuge, yes, or if you want to build a small horizontal river ATS you could reduce or stop your waterchanges and still keep nitrate low (will still need to top off, which keeps some minerals in the water).
 
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