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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I have yesterday filled up with tap water my 240l tank in order to host tanganyikan community fish. Today water has turned cloudy and i already experienced it in previous tanks and didn't worry much as its most probably bacteria bloom that will fade away in 2-3 days. However i have noticed an algae that is starting to form quite rapidly onto the pieced of moor wood i have in the tank. it isn't forming on the rock formations. The algae (at least i am suspecting it to be algae), is like a white-velvet cotton, and is quite uniform in its length as it covers the wood with 2-3mm around the entire piece. Is this normal in a newly set? Will this algae vanish as soon as water settles more?
 

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plecos will work at the algae and over time it will go away. i suggest however that you brush it all off regularly. eventually it will stop. what wood did u use? local hardwoods?
 

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Agreed, fungus, and the wood may be the reason for the cloudy water. I'd take it out and scrub and/or boil it. If you just filled the tank yesterday, the cloudiness is not from a bacterial bloom. New tanks shouldn't cloud up. I"ve never seen this 'bacterial blood cloudiness' when cycling. The only time I"ve seen it is when I overloaded the biofiltration in a tank. Seems every time a new tank clouds up we write if off to bacterial bloom. I'm not convinced there even is such a thing as a visible bacterial bloom that happens in tanks. At least not from nitrifiers, heterotrophic maybe. Dr Tim, thoughts?
 

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Visible bacterial blooms are not from nitrifying bacteria as they do not live in the water coloumn, but from the heterotrophic bacteria as you mention, prov350. I agree that you wouldn't have a bloom in one day unless there is a lot of organic material in the water column. I suspect that it is possibly a matter of fine material suspended in the water column, as new tank setups should not cloud within a day. The fungus on the driftwood is not unusual and usually disappears, or is eaten.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
thanks alot for the replies. infact as the white matter increased on the moor wood, it is now evident that it is fungus. i would not like to take out the wood as i have carefully built up the set-up prior to laying the gravel, and would otherwise ruin all this work. If it usually disappears on its own or eaten as BillD said, then its not much of an issue. i introduced a molly fish today with the hope it might help to take some of it off, and also help with the nitrogen cycle.

Will tanganyikan cichlids get rid off the fungus too? the first fish to be introduced five bar cichlid.
 

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Will tanganyikan cichlids get rid off the fungus too?
I've not known them to do that, but anything's possible.

and also help with the nitrogen cycle.
The nitrogen cycle needs an ammonia source. A fish will provide that, but consider fishless cycling. You can find info on the nitrogen cycle and fishless cyling in the forum library here.
 

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So possibly the heterotroph bloom due to a high organic load? In this case the wood decaying? And that would account for the fungus?

Didn't ask before, but is this a store bought piece of drift wood or something picked up from the wild?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
the wood was used successfully for almost a year in a planted aquarium. changed the set-up for tanganyikan and perhaps the few days it made unsoaked triggered the fungus.
 
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