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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've just acquired a 120 gallon (5'x26"x18") and it came with a monster jack dempsey.

I would like to keep the JD, but I'd also like something other than just the one fish in this monster tank.

Are there any tricks that I am unaware of to introduce tankmates? And what tankmates would work?

Here is a picture of him in the temporary tub while the tank is warming up:

 

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How do you know it's a "meanie"?

Similar sized cichlids MIGHT and I stress might work if all are introduced at the same time.

Typically Jds are not so mean so similar tempered cichlids, two possibly three MIGHT work. Oscars, nicaraguense, uaru and pikes might work... But you will have to find them with some size on them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The previous owner said he's been unable to keep anything alive. I don't personally know he's a meanie. Just hearsay.

I'll try to find an Oscar with some size on it and put them both in at the same time. That way the JD won't have any territory established.
 

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Hi PCircle85,.

Looks like a nice JD; to have that much color sitting stressed in a tub is a good sign. Please post some pics once he gets settled in the tank.

I hope some tank mates work out.

If he turns out to be too aggressive for an Oscar; perhaps a pair of cons would work with a small cave or structure of caves that the JD cannot fit into.

Thanks,
Matt
 

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Hi PCircle85,

I am not sure if the JD or cons would be able to get rid of all the fry. However, if you have a pleco he should be able to make his way in at night and take care of eggs.

I have not had a pair of cons in a "community" setting so perhaps others can share their experience with breeding cons in a community tank.

Thanks,
matt
 

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I've had plenty of con pairs in communities and fry never survive for one reason or another. Usually the parents are ready to spawn again so they wack the fry themselves... But the con pair will have to have a bit of size on them too in order to survive initially...
 

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TheFishGuy said:
I've had plenty of con pairs in communities and fry never survive for one reason or another.
I have quite different experience with my cons. I have had some fry survive from every single batch......with all kinds of different cichlids in the tank, even with a belly crawler pike.They hide in the decor.One of the best fry predators are the preceding batch of fry, so less do survive from each succeeding batch, though at least a couple from each batch always do make it. Once the survivors are of a certain size, I catch them and feed them to my dovii and RBP. I have very minimal decor in this tank.....one large cave for the dovii. In the past I had more decor that was really not functional and had some small feeder cons survive for a number of months with my dovii and red terror.........the cons would gill the dovii and red terror from behind the protective decor and annoy them to no end :lol: , until I finally got smart enough to remove the useless decor.

I think to make a community with a large JD you would be best to have at least 4-5 cichlids. Especially with aggressive cichlids, it is often difficult to make a community work with any less then this. If the fish is very laid back...... maybe 1-2 cichlid tankmates would work, but I still think your chances of success are a lot better with a few more fish. IME, if you have suffecient decor, small cons (to large to be easily swallowed) would have a good chance of doing well with a large JD. Often cichlids are less competitive with fishes that are of a significantly different size. The other cichlids The FishGuy mentioned are also good options.
 

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Hi PCircle85,

That is an amazing JD. Did you measure him before you put him in the tank?

He has excellent colors and great body shape; a lot of older JDs tend to get a hunched back look.

You can tell he is a male by the blue spangles under his eye. If he had more of blue smudges on his lower jaw (opposed to under his eye) it would indicate a female. Plus it is not typical to see a female with bright coloration across her entire body.

I also wanted to comment that I like the gravel and river stones you used to decorate the tank. If you decide to go with convicts those will make great caves for them to retreat to and get away from the JD. You could probably try some midsized convicts now; and if they are smart enough they will hide and only sneak out for food until they get larger, but they will be at risk.

Although he has only been in the tank for a short while, have you noticed anything regarding his temperament? Has he been hiding? Or has he been out checking out the tank/you?

Thanks,
Matt
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
mlancaster said:
That is an amazing JD. Did you measure him before you put him in the tank?
He's roughly 9"

mlancaster said:
Although he has only been in the tank for a short while, have you noticed anything regarding his temperament? Has he been hiding? Or has he been out checking out the tank/you?
He hides constantly, rarely moving the bottom, not even to feed. :(
 

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PCircle85 said:
Possible to tell if male or female without venting?
I couldn't open the last picture but he looks male to me.

Female JDs usually have a lot of blue on the lower gill plate and are less colorful than male JDs, ie less blue spangles.
 

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I would imagine convicts texans green terrors of decent size would be good tank mates. Even some large bp and severums work too in my experience. Just mix up the area before you add the fish. Better chance the jd won't be aggressive upon entry.
 
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