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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I have a 55 gallon tank with a polleni and a catfish at the moment, but its infected with ick right now and things aren't looking at all that great, at least for the polleni, so I've been researching new species of fish to keep once the polleni passes (call me Mr. Optimistic). I stumbled upon the brichardi and have a few questions. I want it to be a species only tank, so how many can I add to the tank? I'm thinking of getting two males and four females, will this work? The tank is also heavily planted, but I'm under the impression that brichardi like planted tanks, right?
 

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Once they pair, you'll be left with the pair. Even in a 55g. Unless you're super lucky and smart about your rockwork (two very distinct territories with sight-lines significantly blocked).

They prefer rocks over plants.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Oh I see. The only rock in my tank is the gravel, everything else is driftwood and plants.. and algae. So I should only pick up a pair then, just to be on the safe side? Or should I just forget about it since I don't really have a tank suited for them?
 

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You could pick up 6 juvies and be prepared to remove every other fish once they pair. And I'd tear out the plants and driftwood and go to your local rock quarry and get ~100lbs of cheap rock. Or a river bed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Blah, that sucks. I guess I'll have to pass, I don't want to rip out all the plants because its about a years worth of labor getting the plants large enough and all that. Too bad, these fish seem really interesting. I'm assuming none of the tangs will mix with plants, huh?
 

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They will mix, sure, but you asked what they prefer. It's entirely possible to have a pair of birchardi in a planted tank, it's just not what they'd prefer to colonize, given an option.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I see. Thanks for the tips! If I do end up getting them, assuming the ick does become fatal, I'll just pick up a few juvies and keep the first pair that forms. So because the tank is planted, does that mean they'll be less likely to want to colonize it?
 

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I don't think the fish really have a preference as far as rocks vs driftwood/plants. Like the majority of fish, Brichardi use structure to determine their territories and for protection. As long as the driftwood provides caves for the Brichardi you are fine.

The typical Tanganyika tank does not include plants because the lake does not contain many plants. Not to mention you may have to replant your plants if the Brichardi decide to dig them up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Man, I really want them but now I don't know. There are several caves that the driftwood makes inside the tank, and the plants provide a lot more additional shade and cover, so they'll have more than enough cover. I'm not too worried about them digging up the plants because the ones that are planted have roots that are pretty long and trenched in, and the other pieces are all attached to my driftwood.

I guess the only way to know for sure is to go out and get them. Thanks for the help! I appreciate it.
 

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If you get regular brichardi, you'll probably be able to end up with two pairs, or at least a trio in a 4ft tank. I've had four pairs of marunguensis, and two pairs of helianthus in 4ft tanks before.

In all probability, if you find a breeder, you could purchase 12, really rock the tank up, and see what happens... you'll end up with more than one pair.

I kept two pair of the Jumbo Brichardi in a 75 gallon for a long time... there were conflicts, but they were wild specimens, and much larger and more aggressive than regular brichardi.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I see. I'm not very happy with pulling my plants and switching them out for rocks, so I honestly think I'll hold off on these fish until at least I get a second tank and set that one up with rock work. I wish I had stuck with rocks instead of plants though, its seriously limiting my option on what kind of cichlids I can keep. :(
 

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I think you should take a look at some South American cichlids. I am a big time Tanganyika fan, but I love my planted tank.
 
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