Cichlid Fish Forum banner
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
179 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I upgraded to a 55 gallon tank, and I was wondering if I use the filter from my 40 gallon along with my new filter and add some of the decor from my old tank if it possible to cycle a tank enough in say a day?
I fear that when I put my JD and GT in the 10 gallon, that my GT will end up dead....
Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,304 Posts
As long as the filter on the 40g is still running and the 40g still has fish in it, yes. If you can start your new filter on the 40g for a day or two before setting up the 55g, even better, but you should have no problems as long as the filter from the 40g is kept in tank water/with fish/running.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,888 Posts
I disagree. There is no way that can cycle your new 55 gallon in one day. Sure it will speed up the process but not in one day. Unless you add some Dr Tim's or any other bacteria in a bottle. But still there is no guarantee this will even do the trick. I would get that filter on there that's established like you want to and add the bacteria in the bottle. Then do all the necessary water tests and see where you are at. I wish you the best of luck! :thumb:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
You can put some media from your old filter on the 40 in the new one on the 55. That will jump start the process but I don't know about 1 day! Maybe if you watch the ammonia and nitrite levels closely and do frequent water changes to keep the levels down you might do OK.

Dave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
179 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
dielikemoviestars said:
As long as the filter on the 40g is still running and the 40g still has fish in it, yes. If you can start your new filter on the 40g for a day or two before setting up the 55g, even better, but you should have no problems as long as the filter from the 40g is kept in tank water/with fish/running.
Hey, that is a good idea! Thanks I didn't think about that one. So realistically, how long should I wait to put my fish in the 55?
I could run the 40 and 55 if need be...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,304 Posts
I should qualify this assertion, I guess - if you're using a bio-wheel or any sort of high-surface-area filter (wet/dry or canister, it doesn't matter), it will work. That includes sponge filters. The surface area and turnover rate on these filters is so much greater than any gravel/decor/whatever that you'll be in the clear. I've done this well over 20 times and never lost a fish to it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
179 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
dielikemoviestars said:
I should qualify this assertion, I guess - if you're using a bio-wheel or any sort of high-surface-area filter (wet/dry or canister, it doesn't matter), it will work. That includes sponge filters. The surface area and turnover rate on these filters is so much greater than any gravel/decor/whatever that you'll be in the clear. I've done this well over 20 times and never lost a fish to it.
It is biowheel sir, so that means its plug and play basically?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,998 Posts
As I understand you are wanting to move the fish and filter and some decor to a bigger tank, no additional fish at this time? In that case I would far prefer that to leaving two large fish together in a ten gallon. There is some risk but far more manageable than the ten. With the larger volume of water, the toxins that might come from the loss of bacteria in the old tank will be offset a good deal by the extra water to dilute it. I would suggest, do it, test frequently for a while and then have a plan to deal with any ammonia that shows up. More frequent water changes, Ammo-carb,Ammo-lock or others are all alternate ways. Choose a path, have it on hand and be ready if trouble should arise. Two large fish in a ten gallon? Almost certain trouble at some point. You are correct to want top change that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
179 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
PfunMo said:
As I understand you are wanting to move the fish and filter and some decor to a bigger tank, no additional fish at this time? In that case I would far prefer that to leaving two large fish together in a ten gallon. There is some risk but far more manageable than the ten. With the larger volume of water, the toxins that might come from the loss of bacteria in the old tank will be offset a good deal by the extra water to dilute it. I would suggest, do it, test frequently for a while and then have a plan to deal with any ammonia that shows up. More frequent water changes, Ammo-carb,Ammo-lock or others are all alternate ways. Choose a path, have it on hand and be ready if trouble should arise. Two large fish in a ten gallon? Almost certain trouble at some point. You are correct to want top change that.
Yes that is correct, let me re explain this. In my 40 gallon I have a JD who is growing like a maniac he is roughly 3 inches (he grew a lot in a month) my GT is still really small like an inch and a half, but my jack likes his space and can be very aggressive towards the terror.
In my 40 gallon, I just have a top fin 40 for my filter, but I bought a biowheel filter for the 55. Iits rated for a 75 gallon. (More filtration is better?) I want to be able to move them as soon as possible so I don't have to put them in a 10 gallon tank. So I was wondering ways to speed up the cycling process.
Would it be possible to fill my 55, and add my old filter, the one currently running my 40 in the 55? Then maybe put my new filter in the 40 to try and get bacteria in the new filter? I would do this for a few days and then switch everything at once to my 55.
Sorry for all the questions, like my scrrenname says I am a newb at this, and I want to do this safely.
Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
249 Posts
If it were me, I'd fill the new tank, put the old filter and it's media along with the new filter on the new tank and move the fish from the 40 gallon to the 55 gallon. I would still keep a close eye on the water parameters by checking it every day or so. After a few weeks, you can probably remove the old filter if you like. This is assuming that you are moving all fish from the old tank to the new tank.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,998 Posts
Some details ,maybe? In theory the bacteria is all over the tank. Most will be sticking to things. I think of it as wall space. There is wall space on tank walls, gravel, decor amd the filter. Some will be found floating around looking for a place to land but little. By design the filter has lots of small surfaces ( filter floss, sponge, bio-wheels) where lots of bacteria can hang on. The filter makes for lots of good O2 that the bacteria need to live as well as a steady supply of food from waste from fish. What you want is to keep the bacteria and food and O2 all together as they each need the other. The new filter will catch some bacteria and begin to grow it's own colonies once it has fish waste and O2. Adding it in with the old filter gives it a good place to get started as bacteria can transfer over. It disrupts things a bit when you move and change but with the larger volume of water things are also a bit more diluted so they kind of balance out. Testing lets you know before things reach a crisis and fish die. Make sense?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
179 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Yes it does make sense, so what I am gathering from this is... it would be okay to set up my new tank and run the old filter as well, and add the fish. But I need to keep a close eye on the tank, test the water, and do water changes more often?
But it is okay to move my fish?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,006 Posts
Two options.

1) Set up the new tank with the new filter, give it a day or two to settle and temp to stabilize. Move the fish, filter, and as much decor, gravel, etc as you can from the old tank to the new tank. Run the new filter and old filter simultaneously on the new tank for at least 6 weeks. Test the water, feed sparingly, and deal with spikes via water changes, and detox products. Spikes may happen because there's no way to move all of the beneficial bacteria from the old tank to the new. So, it may take a bit for the bacteria to rebuild adequate numbers.

2) Setup the new tank with the new filter, and fishless cycle it. Guarantees (as much as anything can) that the tank will be ready for the fish. But, then you've got to run two tanks for a bit. If you go this route take 'some' of the media from the old filter and add it to the new filter once you're ready to cycle the tank. Cycling should take 7-10 days. When the tank is cycled, just move the fish. You won't need to move the old filter to the new tank.

I think that's pretty much what everyone has been telling you, but just tried to summarize.

HTH
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
179 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Alright, I like option 2 it sounds safer.
Thank you all for helping me and not flaming me for all the questions!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,006 Posts
It is safer, although some swear by option 1. Me? I'd rather wait a week and know what my biofilter can do. Be in it for the long haul.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,998 Posts
Yes, safer if you can have both tanks up and running at the same time. Patient waiting is good for us. I'm just not good at it! Test all along to see what is happening. When you are getting no ammonia and no nitrite readings after adding ammonia, then you are golden. You should have nitrate and change that out with water changes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
I moved years ago and had to put all my 25 mbuna & hap's, filters, algae covered rocks, etc. into a brand new 90 gal. Luckly all my fish survived without any problem. I don't reccommend doing this but it can be pulled-off successfully. I used the bottled bacteria and did water changes daily.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top