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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can anyone PLEASE help me.
I've got a tank set up of Electric Yellow's and have had it for around 2 and a half years without a glitch... until now.
My fish are dying in large numbers all of a sudden with no identifiable cause. I've lost between 20-30 in 2 weeks (6 in 1 day :( )
I did a pH test, found it to be acidic so I rectified that (and did a 1/2 tank water change at the same time) and even with the pH perfect now they are still dropping like flies.
And whats worse is they seem happy and of good health then when I come home from work 10hrs later they're dead. (usually 3 at a time)
I've treated with pimafix anti-fungal just in case and it just won't stop.
I'm desperate. I don't want to lose them all :( Can anyone help me?
 

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post complete tank parameters - NH4, NO2, NO3. Temperature. pH (the numbers matter).
How long has this been going on? (sounds sudden).
Any changes you made in the last while?

It could be the sudden increase in pH (if you rectified it quickly) that killed off the second lot.
Also make sure it isn't electrical failure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The latest changes (apart from the pH) are the treatments I've added to try stop the problem.
The new products are:
Seachem Cichlid Trace, Seachem Prime (detoxify nitrate & nitrites & removes chlorine, chloramine & ammonia), Aqua-pics African KH + potassium and Aqua-pics African conditioning crystals.
The temp is sitting at 27 degrees and my retest just then shows the pH at 7.1 (I know it should be a bit more alkaline to be perfect)
I can't give the other readings unfortunately as I've run out of test material for it (husbands been just as busy as I have with work)
It's only arisen in the past 2 and a half weeks.
 

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Dimensions of the tank and stocking? If you have one tank and have lost 20-30 I imagine it is a really big tank?

Is each fish eating every day?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The tank is a 4 foot and there are about 20 left. We've had the numbers high for about 7 months due to them breeding. Yeah they're all definitely eating every day, we keep an eye on the eating habits to make sure of it.

Hope we don't lose them all cos we just got the money to get an 8 foot tank for them
 

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How often and how much water do you generally change? As a tank matures and the size and numbers of fish increase, water change regimens need to be changed accordingly. So, what may have worked the first year could be insufficient the second year. Sounds like that tank was very crowded, even allowing for some of the fish being juveniles.
Perfect water isn't necessary, but stable water conditions are the key to healthy fish.
 

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Just for future reference,

It's better, MUCH better, for the fish to be in slightly acidic water conditions, than to be in "corrected" water conditions. It's best to leave it alone, changing water parameters is complicated, stressful on the fish, and not at all beneficial unless your water is absolutely off the charts acidic, in which case even then a Reverse Osmosis setup would be better than chemicals.

Definitely sounds crowded. Also, what are the other dimensions of the tank? 4 foot tanks are usually 55 or 75 gallons, either way, the 20-30 you already lost are more than it can hold, much less however many you have left. Sounds like overstocking caused a gradual increase in nitrates to a toxic level, possibly not having enough biofiltration for an extremely overstocked tank also cause ammonia and nitrite to spike as the fish got bigger.

Where did you get them? Another possibility is they are mixed breed fish, like the ones you'd get at a chain pet store or from the "assorted Cichlids" tank. These tend to get highly aggressive, they could be killing each other off.

Finally, don't medicate until you have a diagnosis. I know, I've been there when I first started, and I killed fish because of it. I know you want to save your fish, and would rather be "safe than sorry", but medicating without a diagnosis (or symptoms of a disease other than death) can be dangerous, it can harm your fish, it can even hide symptoms of the real disease, which might need to be treated differently, resulting in more fish death.

Definitely do some big water changed, 50%+ every couple of days, daily until you get testing stuff. The most likely scenario here is a combination of changes in water parameters from changing the pH, and an increase of nitrogen toxicity from being overstocked and possible under filtered (on that, what is your filtration setup? How are you cleaning it?)

-John
 

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John27 said:
Just for future reference,

It's better, MUCH better, for the fish to be in slightly acidic water conditions, than to be in "corrected" water conditions. It's best to leave it alone, changing water parameters is complicated, stressful on the fish, and not at all beneficial unless your water is absolutely off the charts acidic, in which case even then a Reverse Osmosis setup would be better than chemicals.
Well, no. RO water will kill African cichlids if not amended. However, any changes should be done gradually, and raising pH can be done simply with baking soda.

As for the OP. We need water test information. Bring a sample to your local fish store and make sure they give ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, pH. As soon as you take that sample, do another 50% water change, skip the conditioning crystals and and only add half as much of the KH stuff. In other words- do what you have been doing before the problems started, and make small changes from there.

My best guess is that for some reason you are going through a nitrogen cycle- but we need the water parameters to know for sure.
 
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