Cichlid Fish Forum banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I ask for help in understanding a situation that has occurred to me.I had an aquarium with several cichlids, barbs and botias, on an alkaline pH. Substrate was basalt.I decided to change the substrate. I took away the basalt and the plants.
And I put this substrate:White Reef Sand MBreda
Description: White Reef Sand MBreda © is a white pearl substrate based on limestone and resins.It goes through a special process of selection of the granules, in which the most noble material is separated to be used.In the cleaning preparation an exclusive protection is applied that avoids the turbidity of the water in the assembly; improving the quality, aesthetics and practicality of use.Developed for use in marine aquariums, where you want crystal clear water and ideal for fish, coral and invertebrates.In the assembly it is possible that some granules float due to the oxygen attached to its surface, this fact occurs by the static generated in the manufacture.There may be a small amount of dust on the surface of the water after assembly. To avoid, it can be rinsed before use, however, it is not necessary.Free of nitrates, phosphates and silicates.

I put the afternoon substrate, two new rocks I found and the plants, which were left in a bucket of still water for three days, until the new substrate arrived. Well, the other day, I went to look and saw that several fish died. Botias, all Barbos. Several cichlids were standing or panting near the surface of the water. They were so weak that I managed to take them by hand and put them in another hospital aquarium, where they quickly recovered.
I just left a Livingstone, which seemed to resist change and was healthier not to let me collect.I wanted to know where I was wrong. I took pictures of the aquarium and the new rocks. The Ph was already pretty alkaline before for fish, I think 8.0 with basalt. Even now, the fish do not fit. I put a zebra back after a change of water, and he stands in a corner. What could have happened? :(
2018-11-30 14.12.26.jpg


IMG_20181130_141207040.jpg
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
40,520 Posts
Post your test results (using an aquarium test kit with liquid reagents) for pH, ammonia, nitrite and nitrate in each tank.

Did you use dechlorinator?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes, I used (dechlorinator).
The ammonia is high, I suppose (green).
I don't have the nitrit and nitrate test, but the ph is 8.5 to 9,0.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
40,520 Posts
Ammonia will kill your fish. It is high in both tanks?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
40,520 Posts
OK the cichlid tank is not safe...take the fish out.

Then, to make it safe, cycle it without fish using ammonia. There is an article about how to do this in the Cichlid-forum Library in the Water Chemistry section. You will need to buy a test kit with liquid reagents and wait approximately six weeks before adding fish.

For your information, the nitrite you will be testing for is also toxic to fish and your tank may have nitrite as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for help DJRansome.
I suspect it was bad business to use the marine sand.
I called the manufacturer, and he said that at first day the product could drop limestone in the water, giving Ph peaks of 9.0 to 10.
The better would be to wash it before (even if you do not need it for the sea) and gradually put the fish to get used to the hardness of the water. This would take up to 8.0 to 8.5.There is an additional factor. The higher the pH, the more ammonia in the toxic form. According to an article I read today, at a pH 8.5 ammonia is 5.5 times more toxic than 7.5.If you consider this, the fact that the ammonia was not cleared, and the fact that the aquarium spent the night at 28º temperature, is the way to catastrophe. My ammonia test didn't give a normal or soft green. Gave me a strong dark green :(
My haste led me to make a mistake that left the balance of 13 dead fish, besides making me very sad.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
40,520 Posts
You should not have ANY ammonia in your tank...I would not suspect the substrate. I have a marine substrate that sounds like what you are describing and it is great for my African cichlids.

How did you cycle the new tank? When you start up a new tank the beneficial bacteria have not had a chance to grow so they can handle/remove the ammonia the fish give off naturally as waste.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I think that I was careless about the filter maintenance and water exchange.
The tank had ammonia all the time. The new substract made things worse.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
40,520 Posts
Read the article about cycling your tank without fish. Beneficial bacteria will grow and remove all the ammonia and other toxins. You will have a healthy tank in six weeks. It does not seem logical that a substrate intended for a marine aquarium would cause an ammonia problem.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top