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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

Been a while since I've been online, but still actively growing my collection.

I've got a question - one of my goldhead comps appears to have rubbed itself up against some rock in the tank and has some abrasions. They don't appear to be bites so far as I can tell. However, his slime coat is showing some pretty significant irritation around the wound. I'm wondering if it's okay to use some Melafix in the tank to help speed the healing process and reduce the irritation.

Other inhabitants in the tank are fronts, calvus, cyps, synos and an elipsifer eel.

Thanks!
Larry
 

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I had problems with using melafix on my fronts - breathing rate went up badly and had to do emergency water changes to get them back to normal. Others use it with no problems though.
 

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I use it all the time on my Mbuna's for nipped fins, scrapes, and such and never had a problem with it.
 

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You can alwasy use a half dose and watch what happens. I had bad results from melafix once but I had miscalculated and grossly overdosed it. It seems to work well at correct dosage.
 

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I would use Mardel Maracyn Plus Antibacteria.

Russ
 

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haha larry nice i use melafix myself. works wonders on my female bettas when they get a little beat up. i wouldnt add it to your existing tank but a hospital tank with it sure helps healing rate.
 

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I have had problems using Melafix too. Seemed to caurse and bacterial bloom and caused the fish (Tropheus in my case) to gasp at the surface. Tea tree oil does help wounds but I hear it can also use up oxygen when being broken down. Add extra airation if using it would be a good plan I think. I prefer anti biotic based products when I can get hold of them after losing fish (I think) to this treatment.

Pretty sure I am not alone in this. If you google Melafix you will find plenty of horror stories.
Link may give a better balanced view. I admit I have a bit of a downer on this product.
http://cichlidkeeping.com/forums/lofive ... t1420.html
and
http://www.koivet.com/a_melaleuca_tea_t ... aling.html

Both Melafix and Pimafix are organic compounds. The bacteria in the tank water (not necessarily the ones on the fish) these products don't kill, sometimes use the Melafix and Pimafix as food! This means that when you add these medications to a tank (especially a tank that has not been maintained well or one that hasn't had regular water changes) there is a small chance that a bacterial bloom will ensue and take up dissolved oxygen. This could mean that you could see, under such circumstances, your fish significantly increase their respiratory rate.

I was told an interesting tidbit. . .The above affect seems to be happening quite often in Italy and API hasn't been able to figure out why, yet.

The fish may seem to be desperately trying to get oxygen and, in effect, they are. This will of course be adding a significant stress factor to an already stressed, sick fish. If the aquarist has any doubt or concern about this, perform an oxygen test before and during the treatment for monitoring purposes.

API has not done much work at trying to figure out all the bacteria that these two compounds are effective against. They don't seem to want to go much further with it. Since aquarists don't know the exact bacteria that is infecting their fish, it might be a moot point whether it was of value knowing what bacteria it was good for, anyway. It IS selling to aquarists!

However, in the professional arena (public and private aquariums, for instance) where scrapings and identification of infections are performed, not knowing whether Melafix and/or Pimafix will treat the bacteria isn't worth the risk. You'll find they don't use these medications.

All the best James
 

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24Tropheus said:
I have had problems using Melafix too. Seemed to caurse and bacterial bloom and caused the fish (Tropheus in my case) to gasp at the surface. Tea tree oil does help wounds but I hear it can also use up oxygen when being broken down. Add extra airation if using it would be a good plan I think. I prefer anti biotic based products when I can get hold of them after losing fish (I think) to this treatment.

Pretty sure I am not alone in this. If you google Melafix you will find plenty of horror stories.
Link may give a better balanced view. I admit I have a bit of a downer on this product.
http://cichlidkeeping.com/forums/lofive ... t1420.html
and
http://www.koivet.com/a_melaleuca_tea_t ... aling.html

Both Melafix and Pimafix are organic compounds. The bacteria in the tank water (not necessarily the ones on the fish) these products don't kill, sometimes use the Melafix and Pimafix as food! This means that when you add these medications to a tank (especially a tank that has not been maintained well or one that hasn't had regular water changes) there is a small chance that a bacterial bloom will ensue and take up dissolved oxygen. This could mean that you could see, under such circumstances, your fish significantly increase their respiratory rate.

I was told an interesting tidbit. . .The above affect seems to be happening quite often in Italy and API hasn't been able to figure out why, yet.

The fish may seem to be desperately trying to get oxygen and, in effect, they are. This will of course be adding a significant stress factor to an already stressed, sick fish. If the aquarist has any doubt or concern about this, perform an oxygen test before and during the treatment for monitoring purposes.

API has not done much work at trying to figure out all the bacteria that these two compounds are effective against. They don't seem to want to go much further with it. Since aquarists don't know the exact bacteria that is infecting their fish, it might be a moot point whether it was of value knowing what bacteria it was good for, anyway. It IS selling to aquarists!

However, in the professional arena (public and private aquariums, for instance) where scrapings and identification of infections are performed, not knowing whether Melafix and/or Pimafix will treat the bacteria isn't worth the risk. You'll find they don't use these medications.

All the best James
Thanks James. That is why I use Kanamycin sulfate and Mardel Maracyn Plus.

Russ
 

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Not sure why people had problems with this, I used to use it in a Central American aggressive overly stocked tank and all the fish did great! They grew extremely fast and never had any torn fins or missing scales my father called the stuff fish steroids. I used to dose it double strength consistently multiple times per week until it became too expensive, now I havnt used it in years but never did I have a problem with it.
 

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24Tropheus said:
There is a small chance that a bacterial bloom will ensue and take up dissolved oxygen.
May not hit any aquarist. May hit one twice. Its a chance thing. I used Melafix and Pimafix for years regularly for Tropheus and other cichlid wounds with great success until that one time. When you see it its quite unmistakable a well filtered tank suddenly not having oxygen and fish gasping at the surface, its not something easy to miss. :(
I have only heard of it happening in Tang cichlid main tanks with high GH and KH never in CA tanks or general community tanks.
Think it is far less likely in treatment tanks rather than if added to the main tank but thats a guess. Just never heard of a treatment tank suffering from this rare problem.

All the best James
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks, everyone, for the feedback. Based on the comments I decided to observe the fish for a while and see if he seems to need any help with recovery. Netting him out of the tank is more likely to cause stress and more potential damage in the tank, given the flightiness of the overall community. Tonight his wounds appear to be improving and show no signs of infection. His slimecoat appears less irritated. Based on this I'm going to continue the observation without any medication unless I see signs of regression.

Thanks all!
Larry
 
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