Cichlid Fish Forum banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, so I know that the presence of egg spots on the anal fin for mbuna does not necessarily imply that the fish is male, as some females will also have egg spots. However, I was wondering if a mbuna has no egg spots on the anal fin, can that rule out the fish being male and imply that the fish is definitely female? If species matters, I am thinking of Kenyi's and Red Zebra's.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,048 Posts
As you said, no, but what size are the fish?

Male Kenyi, as I'm sure you know, go through a transformation of blue to yellow. If there is already a dominant, yellow male, he may be preventing other males from showing themselves.

The Red Zebras I kept years ago were the O-Morphic type which occur naturally in the lake. The dominant male would be peach colored. Almost white. Sub doms where shades of orange with lighter hues towards the peach coloration. All males showed numerous egg spots. Some more defined than others. Females had some as well, but faint and not as numerous.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
I too had a big beautiful yellow Male Kenyi with 3 females. Now I have 100 kenyi in 3 different tanks...the female kenyi did not have egg spots.

I also currently have an o morphic Male red zebra. Gorgeous. The females did not have egg spots. But now I have 35 red zebras.....

Started with 5 yellow labs. 60 of those now.

Had 5 yellow tail blue acei. Spawned once, only 1 fry survived.

Started with 1 tank. Now we have 5.

I'm gonna sell it all (fish included) and get one large tank and stock it with all males.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top