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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know bloat can be caused by several stressful factors, but I had a couple of questions. My tank is 75 gallons with a Fluval 405 and Aquaclear 110 and has been cycled since 2/6/2011. Water conditions are always NH3=0, NO2=0, GH=150, KH=180, pH=7.8, Temp=78F, and I change my water when NO3 gets close to 20 ppm. I feed red stampede grow baby grow since most are shorter than 3 inches. This is my 3rd mbuna tank, and I never had bloat before. This tank I have already had 2 cases. The first was right after my tank cycled, and I attributed it to an extended time with poor water quality. Based on a reccomendation from my fish supplier and against my better judgement, I fully stocked my tank right off the bat with 35 mbuna. Please don't kill me for this. I know I screwed up. All survived the cycle but some started dying immediately after that. I lost 6 that time because I did not know what to look for. This time I lost 3: a polit and 2 demasoni.

I was wondering, in regard to overfeeding leading to bloat, can the act of overfeeding itself lead to bloat or is it more related to water quality? Does anyone have a problem with red stampede or is that a good cichlid food?

Might be overreacting, but I'm just feeling kind of frustrated right now. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
 

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Red Stampede or Red Zebra Grow Baby Grow? Couldn't find any info on 'Red Stampede', however the Red Zebra GBG lists 42% Crude Protein, which in my opinion is pretty high for young adult mbuna. It might be fine for fry or young juvies but I'd switch to something lower in protein as they mature.
 

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I find bloat to be more related to stress (in my tank due to aggression) than anything else, and as long as I act once I see signs I can prevent bloat.

Signs for me are seeing a fish lurking under the surface, especially with colors dull and nipped fins or missing scales. I remove him (extra sub-dom male), let him heal up in the hospital tank and take him to the LFS for store credit.

I start feeding adult food (NLS with 34% protein for me) when the fish is 1.5" or even 1".

Fish surviving a cycle are thought to be permanently damaged so may be more susceptible to illness than others.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Sorry Red Zebra Grow Baby Grow.

Okay. Thanks for your input. I will switch to a food with a lower protein content. My birthday is coming up, and I am also going to get some more rock work to add more cover. There are not many nipped fins, and no one fish really gets picked on too terribly or hangs out near the surface. Too much cover is better than not enough though. Another problem I have is that the only LPS's I have are national chains that will not take trade in fish. Closest locally run place worth a hoot is 1 1/2 hours away.

Man, I really wish I would have cycled the tank prior to adding my mbunas. I really think I would have saved myself a bunch of trouble not to mention money and fish lives. Like I said I knew better.
 
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best way to cycle the tank immediately with no stress i found is to put a sponge filter in an already established tank for a few days... then put that sponge with a good culture on it in the new tank with new water and put your fish in... hasnt failed me yet... learned the hard way cycling a tank from scratch really sucks and is hard on fish... *** done the sponge in other tank thing on 5 diff tanks and it always works... doesnt work if its your only or first tank thou
 

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scubasean130 said:
I was wondering, in regard to overfeeding leading to bloat, can the act of overfeeding itself lead to bloat or is it more related to water quality?

Might be overreacting, but I'm just feeling kind of frustrated right now. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
Yes overfeeding/stress/poor water quality can all lead to bloat. I am dealing with a case of it right now on a tank that i take very very good care of and its a pain in the a$$. I think my case is due to feeding frozen baby brine shrimp. The reason for this is because I hardly ever feed anything besides NLS and the last time I fed the frozen shrimp was a few years ago with the same results (different batch of frozen shrimp obviously). I dont think there is any regulation on the sale of live/frozen food, but also I think it has more of a chance to clog their intestines which could also lead to bloat.

If you use Clout be careful because it can stain the silicone in your tank. A much more safe option is Metronidazole which has worked for me IF you catch it early enough. If not Clout is the way to go, but like i said, Clout is not an option for me if you have to treat your whole show tank and dont have room to move the fish to a less desireable tank. If your fish are still eating and not spitting Metro will be a life saver.

Good Luck.

EDIT* Another note on feeding: Cichlids will come to the tank and look hungry all of the time no matter what. They would eat themselves to death if they could. All a fish needs to survive and thrive is ONE small NLS pellet everyday and even that is a lot. These fish can go a MONTH without eating and still be fine. Look at a mouth brooding female. Feed your fish ONCE a day and try to see if everyone gets at least one pellet and you`re good, nothing more, nothing less.
 
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