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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello!
According to what I have read in this forum, these 3 mbuna species are considered "peaceful"; if you compare them with other mbunas:
L. caeruleus (yellow labs)
Ps. acei (yellow tail aceis)
I. sprengerae (rusties)
According to your experiences, What other(s) mbuna species can be considered peaceful, less aggressive or not so aggressive; compared with others?
Thanks!!! :-?
 

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Why are you wanting to find less aggressive Mbunas?

I would say the three you listed are definitely the lesser of the aggressive ones.

Are you trying to mix Mbunas with something else?
 

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In my experience, Saulosi seem to be fairly less aggressive. However, other people might contradict this.
Another "less aggressive" mbuna i've encountered were Ps. Socolofi.

I think with proper care and enough hiding spots as well as room in a tank, any mbuna (with exception of only auratus and chipokae) could be put in the "less aggressive" category.
I just never seemed to have good luck with auratus. They've always killed each other no matter how big the tank was.
 

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Metriaclima sp. "red top" Gallireya Reef, still not sure what the "official" name is for these - if they were lumped into the Met. sp. long pelvic Gallireya Reef name or not.

Some of the Cynotilapia species are pretty mellow. My Cyno. black mbamba 'Lupingu's are one of the most docile species I've had - even the wild pair is very mellow.
 

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tropheops sp. redcheek is very mellow,
i've also had no problems with trevasse but i remember a post where someone else had aggresion problems. Its only possible to generalise as each individual has its own characteristics - for example i've never had any probs with my group of 12 callianos yet others rate them as more aggresive than greshaeki's which i found a nightmare.
 

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What size tank are you stocking?

I have to respectfully disagree with the Ps. zebra Long Pelvic Galireya, trewavasae and the Tropheops being less aggressive!
 

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I have to agree with Kim on the Tropheops. They are extremely aggressive on the mbuna scale.

I do agree that saulosi are generally pretty tame. My Metriaclima sp. Msobo are mild mannered, but I remember at least 1 person saying females can be pretty aggressive.

Pseudotropheus sp. Dolphin Manda - sorry I don't know the new name. I have one and it's just about as laid back as you get. Just swims around and minds his own business

Labdiochromis perlmutt - my group was very mild mannered. Man, I miss them.
 

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A third vote against Tropheops. I had 3 "red fin" that bred like mad but eventually had to go back to the LFS - babies and all.
 

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chapman76 said:
My Metriaclima sp. Msobo are mild mannered, but I remember at least 1 person saying females can be pretty aggressive.
That would be me...My male is a pussycat unless it's spawning time, my females are devils. :wink:

Just to explain my opposition to the zebra Long pelvic, I lost several juveniles (1 1/2 - 1 3/4 inch) to a rampaging male in a breeding frenzy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Chris2500DK said:
Maybe he just doesn't like to see fish trying to kill each other?
Hello, again and thanks for your replies! :thumb:
You are right, Chris. I have been many years in the fish hobby, but a newbie with mbunas and I am on the process of stocking a 55gal mbuna tank. I want a fairly low maintenance tank with relatively "peaceful" mbunas.
Thanks a lot for your comments!
Any other opinion?
 

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I have to say that I have Metriaclima Red Estherae, Saulosi, Yellow Tailed Acei and Yellow Labs in my tank and so far I have had no problems whatsoever, no spats or scraps, they even seem to play together lol but perhaps I am just lucky. I am a newbie to this hobby but have learned fast and would recommend plenty of rocky hiding places for fish to escape to should any aggression arise.
The very best of luck to you and I hope you find the peaceful combination you desire for your tank :)
 

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cichlidaholic said:
I have to respectfully disagree with the Ps. zebra Long Pelvic Galireya
I have heard this before, and not just from you - regarding the attitude of these guys. Maybe I just lucked out with some calm specimens, but in a 55 I had two full color males and a halfway decent third one - and they never so much as blinked at one another.... :lol:
 

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Estherae and Socolofi are at the top of the aggression scale IME. Got rid of the Socolofi (not because of that), but did have them in this tank.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
DJRansome said:
Estherae and Socolofi are at the top of the aggression scale IME. Got rid of the Socolofi (not because of that), but did have them in this tank.
Hi...again!
I find your experience a very interesting one, DJ. The CF species profile for Ps. socolofi says that this fish is weakly territorial in the aquarium and a good species for beginners. For its temperament and conspecific temperament, it is described as mildly aggressive. :eek:
OK people, How have been your experience with this fish? Same as DJ or a little different?
Thanks in advance for your comments!!! :thumb:
 

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Or if you want immediate gratification, do a search! I'd say 75% of the Socolofi posts I've read since I joined 2 years ago describe them as above average in the mbuna aggression line up.

Albino Socolofi...maybe different. I really like them though and I would get them again. They just weren't peaceful, at least for me.
 

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I understand and appreciate the 'list' you're trying to generate. However, the descriptions mild or aggressive etc.... are, and can never be, anything but very rough generalizations. They are, at best, a basic point of reference for the totally uninitiated beginner. In various situations the mild can be wild and the aggressive can be passive. There are no absolutes and a seemingly infinite number of variables to how well any group or groups will interact within the confines of of the set-up they're placed in. Read here and talk to fellow hobbyists to get the broad sweep of experiences and possibilities but the #1 job of the successful fishkeeper (IMHO) is to pay attention to their fish. Careful observation will allow you to modify (or eliminate) variables until you have a successful tank.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
It was IMO a great finish for this friendly discussion, nick a. :thumb:
Believe me, it has been a great pleasure to change ideas with all of you and I feel grateful for all your comments.
Bye! :wink:
 
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