Cichlid Fish Forum banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

Here's a fish that I have bounced around a lot for ID thoughts, and want to see if some experts could weigh in.

I am guessing Midas Cichlids, because I know they look similar to this as juveniles, and on rare occasion some of them retain this pattern into adulthood. I found some examples and it does look very similar, but not exactly, so I'd like to see if I am right to call this a Midas. Or could it be a hybrid? This spot has a lot of species in good number that might be in the genetic mix, and the bedding ledges are crowded and heavily combative: Banded Cichlid, Midas Cichlid, Mayan CIchlid, Spotted Tilapia, Tiger Oscar, & Zebra Tilapia (also Jaguar Guapote & Butterfly Peacock Cichlid, but those two are not in the genetic mix).

Here is where my confusion is centered around the 3 most likely candidate species:

*It has the spot-like bulges in the bars, aligned laterally across the middle of the side. This is typical of the Midas pattern, and also observed in Spotted tilapia. I would be set to call this a Midas, but the fins are dark. Midas fins are light. Or do I have that wrong?

*Side markings are very Mayan Cichlid-like, but it's much deeper than most Mayas, the head shape is too concave, and it's so dark while the Mayans in this area this day were all lit up very bright red and green. Also lacks the red dorsal fin margin and distinct marginated spot/bar at the caudal peduncle.

*Marked and colored more like Zebra Tilapia than anything else, but the first dorsal spines are way too short, there is no lighter band at base of caudal, and the light vertical bars are too dark.

Thanks for any help you can give me on the ID! :)



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,193 Posts
It's a midas cichlid-type. An Amphilophus species. There are about 15 species in the genus that are not reliably distinguishable. The most common types in the aquarium hobby are the midas and red devil, and generally aquarium strain are a mix of these two (and sometimes one or some of the other 15 species as they have also been imported into the hobby over the last 20 years or so).
Not a mayan. Tail spot doesn't fit. Tail spot is like that of a midas-type. Also the snout and forehead is like that of a midas-type.
Color often doesn't mean too much in identifying SA/CA cichlids. There chameleon-like. Sometimes, they turn black in color as soon as they come out of the water.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
BC in SK said:
It's a midas cichlid-type. An Amphilophus species. There are about 15 species in the genus that are not reliably distinguishable. The most common types in the aquarium hobby are the midas and red devil, and generally aquarium strain are a mix of these two (and sometimes one or some of the other 15 species as they have also been imported into the hobby over the last 20 years or so).
Not a mayan. Tail spot doesn't fit. Tail spot is like that of a midas-type. Also the snout and forehead is like that of a midas-type.
Color often doesn't mean too much in identifying SA/CA cichlids. There chameleon-like. Sometimes, they turn black in color as soon as they come out of the water.
More great info - thank you again. I now remember seeing a video of Midas Cichlids being taken in and out of water, and seeing them change color from orange to black and back again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,193 Posts
Sizuper said:
seeing them change color from orange to black and back again.
Midas-types are orange/yellow when they come from murky water. It's thought to be a way that they can find mates in murky water by their brighter colors. They all start out barred, and in the wild, undergo the "peeling" process to change to orange/yellow at a much older and larger size then they do in captivity. If they changed as juvies they would probably be much easier targets for predators. There are environmental triggers, and in captivity they undergo the "peeling" process usually as young juvies (maybe due to a lack of predators? or other environmental triggers?). Also the breeders have selected for early "peeling" because nice orange/yellow fish sell better then dull brown striped fish. And I often see midas/RD juvies that have not 'peeled' yet, left over in a tank after all their orange/yellow siblings have already been sold long before.
But most midas types are barred and do not "peel" because they are not from murky water. A few of the Amphilophus species only have barred types, though probably most of the Amphilophus species have both barred and yellow/orange types dependent on whether they originate from murky or more clear water.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top