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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,
As stated. I did a fishless cycle on a 75G tank with a 20G Sump/Refugium. Added all my fish
last week, and already have long green algae growing on the shells, rocks, and tank walls!
All parameters are good.
Ammonia-0
Nitrite-0
Nitrate-0
dkh-8
ph-8.4
temp-78
All of this is consistent. Haven't checked phosphates yet.
I Will be doing a water change this weekend. Is this long stringy algae normal?
I'm so used to reef tanks where this stuff is poison! I'm ready to hook up a GFO/Carbon
reactor which should help prohibit the hair algae if needed!
Let me know what you think?
 

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It wouldn't concern me too much, algea seems common when starting a new tank. Maybe it's getting some sunlight. That caused a large bloom in my tank. Opened a blind that let some sun into the room, walls were green in days. It'll die off though.
 

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If the algae is soft and flowing in the current it is probably harmless and you can just remove it and get a bristlenose pleco to help with it in the future.

Your tank should have some nitrate if it is cycled. I like to keep my nitrate between 10ppm and 20ppm. If you don't shake the test kit enough, sometimes you get a false zero reading.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
DJRansome said:
If the algae is soft and flowing in the current it is probably harmless and you can just remove it and get a bristlenose pleco to help with it in the future.

Your tank should have some nitrate if it is cycled. I like to keep my nitrate between 10ppm and 20ppm. If you don't shake the test kit enough, sometimes you get a false zero reading.
It is soft and flowing in the current.
The tank went through a full fishless cycle, and then I added the fish. Maybe I'm reading 0 Nitrate, because the plants, and sand in my refugium are taking up all the nitrates.
 

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Well maybe but then you would not likely have the algae. It's growing due to excess nutrients.

Did you have a nitrate reading when the fishless cycle was complete?

Also with a planted tank you don't want nitrates to get to zero (I learned that the hard way). When nitrates are zero the plants have no food and don't do well. Good environment for cyanobacteria. So you would have to add nitrate. You don't want it to get below 10ppm.
 

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Ever thought about getting an algae eater of some kind? In my tanganyika tank, I have a chinese algae eater (the only non-tanganyikian inhabitant in the tank), and my tank is always completely algae free and haven't had to use my mag float glass cleaner since having this fish.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
jrf said:
How about your lighting - what type, how many watts, and how long do you have them on? Also, does the tank get direct sunlight during the day?
I know lighting was way to high! I have a 6x54w T5 setup from a reef tank. I turned off 3 bulbs, so now I'm running 3x54w T5's about 8 hours a day, and I hooked up a carbon/GFO Reactor. The GFO should reduce phosphate levels thus starving out the hair algae. (I hope).
 

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Your light level is still very high, presuming you're running T5HOs. You're still likely to have algae problems. People run heavily planted tanks with CO2 injection with less light than that. If you're running a fish-only tank, you can easily get by with only one of those bulbs, and still have a very brightly-lit tank.

Also, green thread algae is not eaten by most of your typical algae eating fish. I've heard that rosy barbs will eat it, but have no personal experience.
 
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