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Has this ever happened to anyone?

I have a female Lombardoi that is holding now for the third time in about six months. The earlier two times she held for about two weeks and then would start eating again. I never witnessed the breeding but the tank is just Lab/Zebra hybrids, Saulosi, and the one Lombardoi so I assume it was a male Saulosi since they are both striped.

As a disclaimer I all ready know that having a Lombardoi in the tank isn't ideal, I am willing to rehouse it if it becomes a problem. I also will never let any hybrid fish leave my house (unless I move to a new one) ect. That being said I don't want this to turn into another thread that starts off interesting than gets locked.

Because the fish has held twice all ready and is just by virtue of its species and size the most dominant fish in the tank I don't think it would consume its own eggs out of being stressed by the other fish. This is making me think that this particular fish cross is not genetically viable, even though I am pretty sure I have seen other people's Metriaclima x Pseudotropheus crosses.

To reduce the post to a single question: Has anyone else had these two species cross before?
 

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no, but up until about 5 years ago lombardoi was still classified as psuedotropheus. I think all mbuna can interbreed. I would think that the zebra's would be a more likely father. THey are both metriaclima and the lombardoi males are yellow in color more similar to the orange-yellow of zebra's than anything else.
 

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I have had this hybrid occur. It is definitely possible. Though unfortunately I ended up getting the fish themselves, not knowing what their bloodline was. The resulting offspring have a tendency to have females turn yellow as the Lombardoi males do. Also, almost all the fish get the higher number of stripes on their side. According to the articles of Ad Konings, the Lombardoi ought to have 4 stripes in the region below the roots of the dorsal fin. Where salousi have 6-7. I've been breeding the mixed blood out best I can, but it's maybe 5/100 offspring that gave me the 4 stripes. Still, females sometimes turn yellow. It would take several generations to get them right again. The same problem occurs with Pseudotropheus Demasoni, which also ought to have the 4 stripes on the region below dorsal roots. All mbuna are genetically viable. And genetic flow between species is common even in wild populations. However it's limited in that case by geography. They only mix from time to time with populations that are closely located. This makes accurate descriptions harder for individual species. Though I prefer to defer to the descriptions of Ad Konings. Most reliable source.
 

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Salousi brings yellow female blue male, 6-7 stripes below dorsal, 10cm length average.

Lombardoi - blue female, but yellow male (change happens at four months approximately), 4 stripes below dorsal, average length 15cm.

This mix causes the length to become anywhere between those points. The colour, females possibly turn yellow later. Males tend to still go yellow. All offspring born blue as Lombardoi do. Stripes, 4-7, often broken and irregular patterns due to different shape lines between two species. Body shape still appears to be Lombardoi.
 
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