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was walking with the kids around the hood the other day and came across a lake/frog pond (new it was there, never really checked it out though) anyway...

as we squished the clumps of grass along the shoreline I saw dozens of little freshwater shrimp shooting in every direction... Growing up in Alaska we used to call these little pond shrimp "Scuds". These little guys look the same.

I was thinking about feeding them to my fish but was wondering if anyone had any knowledge about the possibilities of cross contaminants from disease or whatever? Wasn't sure if temp differences in wild ponds vs. 80 degree aq water would solve all that? Is it worth it?

I suspect the answer is no, if not I'll just give breeding cherry shrimp a go I think. :) TIA
 

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BioG - can we expand the inquiry to other similar wild caught critters, like the baby crawdads I discovered and collected as a kid? They were all of 3/8" long and I kept them for months in an aquarium with livebearers.
 

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I feed my fish all kinds of aquatic insect larva as well as the amphipods I find in local streams and ponds. I used to do this more often when I was into smaller fish that needed conditioning to breed. There are some risks associated with this but for the most part I've had great success. Crayfish are another decent live food source, but they should be fed sparingly and to fish that can handle them. Many of my puffers had the occasional crayfish and they loved it.

Cherry shrimp are also really easy to breed and make a good addition to the diet of fish, mine go crazy for them. Put them in a 35 gallon by themselves with some java-moss and before you know it you'll have thousands of them.

I've also had good success with white worms and black worms. White worm colonies are easy to maintain and propagate and are perfect for those with a box and a cold seller.

Try out some of the Gammarus in one of your tanks, altos love them. Give it a month and if you have no problems feed them as desired. If you have a sand bottom in any of the aquariums the Gammarus make great scavengers and will persist and breed in the aquarium offering a constant dietary supplement while cleaning up leftover food.
 

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BioG I read this a while ago about the same kind of question
They sometimes play host to intermediate stages of internal parasites such as camellanus nematodes. Snails serve the same function. In these nematodes, they need a host such as a shrimp or snail in order to complete their development cycle.
I'm sure there are plenty of other parasites that do the same thing with these critters. Always best to quarantine anything before putting it in your tanks.
So you probably could feed them, but I would not risk it. I'm a very paranoid fish keeper as most people know.
Just start breeding the cherry shrimp.
I breed crystal black/red shrimp, low grade :D , and CPO crayfish along with a few variants of mystery snails. Its very easy.
I have breed the cherry shrimp as well for a short time but the breed like convicts :lol:
 

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Probably the most frequent imports with the wild caught daphnia that I used to feed my fish were hydra and water beetles. The water beetles are shortly eliminated, but not hydra. However, hydra would only be a problem to tiny fry; and food for juvie and older cichlids which would eliminate them shortly.

I don't recall having introduced any "exotic" bad guys when I was feeding wild caught live food though.
Back in the days when I lost 3 Oscars to Hole in Head I thought it was something introduced when I was feeding black crickets and earthworms I collected. Now we know better. Ten % water changes a week weren't enough for 3 Oscars in a tank and my water "bleeped". And I didn't know it.

And I am still paranoid about what I put in my tanks. I boil, bleach, and acid treat (hot vinigar water) my river rocks before using them in my tanks. It is what I can't see that bothers me. But paranoia means being "overly worried about something without justiification for being so".
 

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Lestango said:
But paranoia means being "overly worried about something without justiification for being so".
Exactly. No live food from the wild goes into my tanks. Just no way of knowing what pathogens and bacteria you might be adding. Except Marine for freshwater fish and freshwater for Marine fish might be OK, though who can tell for sure? Plenty animals can survive both sets of conditions, I would guess bacteria and viruses are no different.

All the best James
 

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Darkside said:
Cherry shrimp are also really easy to breed and make a good addition to the diet of fish, mine go crazy for them. Put them in a 35 gallon by themselves with some java-moss and before you know it you'll have thousands of them.
+1 for this, the best thing about them is variable size anywhere from 2mm up to 30mm and they breed like mad. You dont need a tank that big for them either I keep mine in a 12ish gal tank.

Regards

Ollie
 

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I have used and cultivate scuds in the past. They are a great algae eater and thrive on hair algae. Live food that comes from waters that don't have fish in them should not have any fish parasites.
 

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IMO just stick with the cherry reds...

What I personally do is keep them in 20 gallons with plecos. The plecos don't eat the shrimp.... so it makes a pleco tank more enjoyable by watching the shrimp etc.

I keep several types of shrimp.... mostly to feed my fish :) But also sell them to fish stores, auctions etc...

There are different color morphs of cherry reds that breed just as easily :) Yellows, Snowballs, blues greens... etc..

Just a few ideas for you. Instead of just having a "shrimp" tank ;)
 
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