Cichlid Fish Forum banner
41 - 60 of 60 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Discussion Starter · #41 ·
Thanks for the input everyone. on the Apistogramma forum they were suggesting I try to get under 5 for PH. So low! The fish are happy and colorful now, but I would prefer successful breeding over non obviously.
how fast is too fast when reducing PH? I know it needs to be a slow process to preserve their health. I’ve added another 70 almond leaves but when I get home from work, I think I may need to take a bunch out to avoid swinging too fast. I think 70 may have been a mistake. This is my first time trying almond leaves to manage PH. I just don’t want to make any mistakes That cause death.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Discussion Starter · #43 ·
I don't think adding those almond leaves will change the pH very quickly, but adding that many at once might deplete the oxygen in the tank, just keep an eye on things...
Thanks for that, I forgot to add that I’ve got three bubblers in there for now. How long do you think the additional aeration will be needed?
would you personally approach this differently than I am when it comes to PH? I’m thirsty for input 😈
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
I think you are doing everything right, but I am not very experienced at this, I do have very soft water with almost no KH, but the pH out of the tap is about 6.8. I have always added almond leaves to some tanks but the pH has never dropped significantly despite the low KH, probably as I do regular water changes. That said I have never put 70 leaves in at once, that might make a difference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Discussion Starter · #45 ·
I think you are doing everything right, but I am not very experienced at this, I do have very soft water with almost no KH, but the pH out of the tap is about 6.8. I have always added almond leaves to some tanks but the pH has never dropped significantly despite the low KH, probably as I do regular water changes. That said I have never put 70 leaves in at once, that might make a difference.
Do you think almond leaves would be more effective in RODI water? In an apistogramma forum I’m being told I need RODI for the Bimaculata and I’m not fully understanding why low TDS is needed for some soft waters while it isn’t really suggested for others, such as my cacatuoides. I’ve got the RODI unit for my reef tank so I’ve been doing RODI as about 70% of my WC make-up
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
Do you think almond leaves would be more effective in RODI water? In an apistogramma forum I’m being told I need RODI for the Bimaculata and I’m not fully understanding why low TDS is needed for some soft waters while it isn’t really suggested for others, such as my cacatuoides. I’ve got the RODI unit for my reef tank so I’ve been doing RODI as about 70% of my WC make-up
Probably, I have not measured the TDS or conductivity of my water and never used RO water as my water is so soft. It is the true blackwater species that need this sort of water with very low pH, conductivity and TDS. I think one reason is the very low bacterial count of this type of water, fishes have not evolved immunity to infections they never encounter. A. Cacatuoides is not a blackwater fish and is found in a range of different water conditions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Discussion Starter · #47 ·
Little update
theyve been improving their color daily. I feed them frozen food nearly every day and they seem to love it.
the supposed male seems to be displaying a breeding tube for the last week or so.
the first pic is the one I think is male. The suspected female is looking noticeably better with a hint of yellow
i’ve noticed the female chasing the male around much more than usual they usually end up dancing.
Vertebrate Water Organism Fin Fish

Water Plant Organism Aquatic plant Terrestrial plant

Bird Beak Underwater Fish Fin

Beak Bird Underwater Organism Fin
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Discussion Starter · #51 · (Edited)
Very nice! The last two pictures are the female? Appears to have the breeding tube out, but difficult to see for sure as the photo is not in focus, but looks to be female.
I agree clearer pics would be helpful.

I've not seen a breeding tube that large before, are you sure it's not swollen tissue?
No, I am not sure. I have some concern about this because it’s on what I suspect to be the MALE. It was my impression that acara tubes are significantly smaller than this anyways. it’s extremely hard to capture in a photo. He pooped a few minutes after those last pictures, which may be contributing to the size. Even when not preparing to deficate, I feel the tube is larger than it should be. i Am at work right now but will get better pics tonight And post them immediately.

appetite is FEROCIOUS
if this was your fish, how would you treat swollen tissue in the anus? Treat the food with something like Metro? Epsom? Peas? I tried a pea last night but no luck. I picked up some garlic additive to try again tonight. My other cause for concern is that this particular fish has been showing this tube thing for nearly a week, I haven’t seen it retract.

here’s the only crappy pics I have on me. The first pic is from the same night, the second pic is what it usually looks like
Fin Underwater Fish Marine biology Tail

Underwater Organism Marine biology Fish Scaled reptile
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
Hmm yes, a male breeding tube should be much smaller, thinner and pointed. I believe Epsom salts can be used to treat an anal prolapse but I have never experienced this and have no idea of the dosage or how to go about treating it. Hopefully someone else can help
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,397 Posts
Epsom salt (magnesium sulfate) is a good option to help reduce swelling and the suggested dosage is 1 tablespoon Epsom salt per 5 gallon of aquarium water, added slowly to the aquarium over a couple hours and watch the fish for any adverse reactions.

You can also use the bath method and adjust dosage to the size of the container and I think the suggestion is a maximum of 30 minutes but again watch for adverse reactions.

You may be better off dosing the bath method as I think you are running a low pH and alkalinity tank? I'm not sure of your tank water parameters so it may be helpful to post them up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Discussion Starter · #54 ·
Hmm yes, a male breeding tube should be much smaller, thinner and pointed. I believe Epsom salts can be used to treat an anal prolapse but I have never experienced this and have no idea of the dosage or how to go about treating it. Hopefully someone else can help
Epsom salt (magnesium sulfate) is a good option to help reduce swelling and the suggested dosage is 1 tablespoon Epsom salt per 5 gallon of aquarium water, added slowly to the aquarium over a couple hours and watch the fish for any adverse reactions.

You can also use the bath method and adjust dosage to the size of the container and I think the suggestion is a maximum of 30 minutes but again watch for adverse reactions.

You may be better off dosing the bath method as I think you are running a low pH and alkalinity tank? I'm not sure of your tank water parameters so it may be helpful to post them up.
I reached out to the breeder and shared all of these pictures. This morning, he responded:
Nothing to be concerned about. This is completely normal for this species. The females always look like this, sometimes it even becomes red, looking very much like the fish would be ill, but all the females look like this, also in the wild.
this brings me relief, I had become more and more sure of prolapse as I read online. I still find it very odd and peculiar
i am also surprised, because this fish was the one I suspected to be male. It’s been showing the darker colors lately.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Discussion Starter · #57 ·
The Cacatuoides laid eggs on the underside of a leaf :whistle:
cute little fish. They try to act tough to the bimaculatas but they can’t even phase them. The female seems to do all the legwork but the male will come flare up quite often. Her defensive instincts are so beautiful to observe. I appreciate they they rely on intimidation instead of fin tearing. I put a ton of almond leaves piled around the nest so she stays hidden and it’s worked well to lower stress, she just hangs out in the leaf pile now. Doubt the babies will make it too long in here though
Plant Vertebrate Wood Vegetation Terrestrial plant
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Discussion Starter · #58 ·
My Cacatuoides hatched their eggs and my bimaculata ate a decent number of them as expected. Within two days, my female Bimaculata began exhibiting defensive tendencies and staying near her nest. No visible eggs yet but it’s within a huge cluster of almond leaves so I can’t get a good view.
they are like puppies. If I tap the aquarium they swim to the surface to beg. they follow my whenever I walk past the aquarium little hogs!
Plant Leaf Botany Terrestrial plant Organism

Plant Water Vertebrate Underwater Terrestrial plant
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Discussion Starter · #60 ·
Oh wow... the coloration on your I. bimaculata is really starting to pop. They look great! :cool:
thank you! They have more color every week. The blue is starting to show nicely
I continue to use RODI for their water changes.
I’m obsessed with these fish. They’re fearless but they don’t instigate and I love that. The Cacatuoides continue to breed and they can do nothing to dissuade these Bimac (who aren’t genuinely interested in the first place) it’s like watching a fly try to kill a horse 😂
They Aren’t side by side all of the time, but any time the female starts working on a nest, the male guards closely.
Scaled reptile Organism Terrestrial plant Underwater Terrestrial animal

Vertebrate Fin Organism Underwater Fish

Organism Fin Underwater Fish Terrestrial plant
 
41 - 60 of 60 Posts
Top