Cichlid Fish Forum banner
1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Hi,

Coming in a little late, but here goes:

1) You need transient ammonia / ammonium to feed the nitrosomonas to get nitrites which feed the nitrobacter to get the benign-at low-level nitrates which are consumed by plants or diluted by water changes. Why did you put an ammonia absorber? It sounds like your tank hasn't yet cycled. If you have an emergency ammonia situation you should continue the WC's and the liberal use of Prime. Prime binds up the ammonia, but it is still available to the nitrosomas.

2) Also, why did you put charcoal in your filter? It has value only to remove medications, since due to clogging it has a useful life in an aquarium of only a few days.

3) Stop cleaning your filter. The biological filtration especially should be left alone until your tank has fully cycled as defined as zero ammonia and zero nitrite. Even when done properly, cycling a tank can take more than 6 weeks. Sorry to say, it seems that some of the actions you've taken have inhibited the process.

4) It sounds like you have a veritable chemical laboratory at your house. That's good. Me too. OTOH, please realize that your $10 aquarium hobby test kits - especially GH and NO3 - often give inaccurate and sometimes crazy-wrong, results. They need to be tested versus a standardized solution http://www.rexgrigg.com/diy-reactor.htm#kit (bottom of page) for an example. Otherwise, test kits should be used to indicate direction, like positive or negative. If your ammonia kit or nitrate kit show "positive" take action (BTW, these two kits, TG, tend to be more reliable).

You'll be relieved to learn that once your tank is up and running, you'll be able to back off on the WC's.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
If you must have a test kit for chlorine / chloramine:

http://www.customaquatic.com/estore/con ... -RLR440006

I use these strips to test whether chloramine has broken through the carbon cartridges on my RO units.

If you have enough plants, then there would have been no point to cycling your tank. Test your ammonia kit, as suggested above.

After you're cycled and have been changing your water regularly for a few months, you might want to play the scientist again and test all of the variables. But if you get an unexpected number, first question the kit. If its accuracy can then be confirmed using a standard solution, distilled, or even tap water using your water company's analysis, then think through actions to address the possible problem. The kits commonly available to the hobbist are only better than nothing. Even the LaMotte kits should be dealt with in the same way.
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top