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I was given a large group of fish and am trying to ensure I properly ID them all before I pass them on, keep and breed them or house them inappropriately. You can help.

If you can accurately ID any of these fish please note below. Thanks in advance!
 

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1. Some variation of a "red" peacock
2. Eureka red
3. Dragonblood peacock, these vary alot from white to orange to red to pink
4. Don't know
5. Yellow lab mix
6. Don't really know new world's
7. See number 6 :)
8. Pink convict
 

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1. Male Aulonocara stuartgranti-ish... it is hard to guess if he is a pure type. Kinda of like a some of the yellow sided types but hard to know. Mixes are common. Should color up a lot more, see what he looks like

4. Mbuna maybe Cynotilapia "afra" ... if male should lighten up to blue-purple with black bars

5. Yellow Lab hybrid that are very common, Red Zebra mix
 

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#6 is a Port Acara. A Cichlasoma species. There are 13 species in the genus. It can be fairly difficult to determine which particular species it would be with out knowing the original collection point. If you are really intent on determining the specific species a start would be to count the anal spines. Having only 3 anal spines would at least narrow it down to one of 6 species and having 4 or more anal spines would narrow it down to one of 7 species. After that, certain traits might be able to narrow it down further.

#7 is a Guinacara species. There are 6 species in the genus. With out knowing their original collection point, probably even more difficult to be certain of which species. These fish are sometimes caommonly called "Bandit cichlids"
 

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BC in SK said:
#6 is a Port Acara. A Cichlasoma species. There are 13 species in the genus. It can be fairly difficult to determine which particular species it would be with out knowing the original collection point. If you are really intent on determining the specific species a start would be to count the anal spines. Having only 3 anal spines would at least narrow it down to one of 6 species and having 4 or more anal spines would narrow it down to one of 7 species. After that, certain traits might be able to narrow it down further.

#7 is a Guinacara species. There are 6 species in the genus. With out knowing their original collection point, probably even more difficult to be certain of which species. These fish are sometimes caommonly called "Bandit cichlids"
Hopefully, at some point in the future, there will be another revision that simplifies things to the point we can actually know what we are looking at.
 
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