Cichlid Fish Forum banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First off I am new to this forum and am really just getting started with a cichlid tank! I have a 30 gal setup of black skirt tetras, blood fins, corys, bushynose and serpaes, also had a beautiful betta in this tank for a little over 3 years until he passed away only recently. It has been a great starter set and still cant bear to part with it. About 8 months ago graduated to a 55 gal that I bought from a friend which came with fish, blood parrot, gold severum, tiger,ruby,cherry barbs and a bushynose and 8" common pleco. Have enjoyed it so much cant wait to establish a 75 gal african cichlid tank. *** done alot of research but seems the more I read the more confused I am. Since I am not interested in breeding would it be okay to only get males, or should I go by the rule of thumb 2-F/ 1-M to ward off aggression? Other concern I have is I am on well water, though *** never had it proffesionally tested, the test strips all indicate high PH and my other tanks do well with weekly 30-50% water changes and adding some aquarium salt and water conditioner for the chloramines. Will this be okay for the African Cichlid tank as well? The fish I am looking at getting so far are Blue Dolphins,Yellow Labs and Dogtooth. If anyone has any info or sugestions please feel free to comment!! Sorry this is so long I think Im on fish overload right now haha!!! Thanks in advance
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,304 Posts
Check out the library section here and read about mbuna "community" tanks as well as all-male tanks. Generally with a 75gallon you want to stick to 3-4 species, 1m/3-7f (depending on the species and its aggression levels) of each. With the labs, sex ratio doesn't matter as much (plus, they're really hard to sex when they're young... when they're old, too, for that matter). The afra, you'll probably want to pick a species with attractive females (many are bland).

If by blue dolphins you mean the hap (C. moorii), those get much too large for a 75g. In terms of aggression, it'd probably work, but you'll want to give them some more space to grow and swim. You could probably do it short-term, but make sure you have a new home for them when they outgrow the tank.

Both afra and YL's are good choices for a beginner with mbuna - not too aggressive, nice colors.

High pH is perfect. I've never used any salt, but I've heard good things about it.

Keep asking questions and don't apologize for it, unless you completely ignore our advice ;)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
40,501 Posts
Welcome to Cichlid-forum! All good advice, I don't use salt either.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
I have a 75 gallon mostly male "show" tank and a 65 gallon mostly male show tank. The additional 65 gallon happened because this hobby is an addiction!! ha ha
I went w/ the advice from a local fish store who said it was okay to mix different Malawis togethers... I have quite a mix and LOVE it. I have run into only a few agression problems which I was fortunately able to handle w/o any fatalities (the 2 tank thing helps and a time out net-breeder net). Only a few of my peakcocks were purchased in pairs the rest of my fish are singles. The singles are all different types of fish (peacocks, haps, mbuna..). I have tried to get all males but it doesn't always work out that way so there are a few females swimming around. I have had two batches of fry, which is okay but I am not into breeding either but it's fun to watch them grow and my son loves them. My females have fared very well in the tanks. THe only problem I have had is when they are holding the agression against them can become too much. I have a small 10 gallon tank for that purpose if needed.
The high ph water should be perfect! I use my tap water as well (high ph). I do use Cichlid salt and have used it since I started. I assume it's a good thing but honestly have nothing to compare it to.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top