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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Flippercon said:
Ok I have had the ivy in the tanks for 3 weeks now and the results are great. no harm to any fish at all. My dojo loach hangs off it. :lol: well the reduction in nitrates is outstanding. I have not changed wc or feeding schedules at all just the ivy in the tank.My 125 had a bad nitrate problem it was going up to 20-30ppm in 3days, with 2 50% wc with vacuum a week. Now its one 50% wc a week and nitrates are at 10 ppm. :D :thumb: I would definitely recommend this method to help with nitrate reduction, as long as wc were done on a regular basis.
Very Cool! Thanks for experimenting!
 

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Yeah no problem. Gotta go steal some more from my mothers house. Thinking about getting a bunch and rubberbanding a bunch together and growing it up the wall. Got an experiment to make a curtain out of some. I have a 55 in front of a window and this would be a pretty cool curtain if I can get enough.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Flippercon said:
Yeah no problem. Gotta go steal some more from my mothers house. Thinking about getting a bunch and rubberbanding a bunch together and growing it up the wall. Got an experiment to make a curtain out of some. I have a 55 in front of a window and this would be a pretty cool curtain if I can get enough.
Good idea. But as of right now, you just threw some on top of the water?
 

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I stuck the cuttings (like a vine) in the water. So one end was under the water (about 4-6") , and the rest I Hung over the side of the tank. My idea was to just bunch more together with a rubber band so you have more then just a few in the water. Kinda like a 5x effect. I will take some pictures when I get off work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Flippercon said:
I stuck the cuttings (like a vine) in the water. So one end was under the water (about 4-6") , and the rest I Hung over the side of the tank. My idea was to just bunch more together with a rubber band so you have more then just a few in the water. Kinda like a 5x effect. I will take some pictures when I get off work.
Thanks
 

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If you do use Pothos ivy be cautious if you have other animals in the house. If it is ingested by a cat or dog it could be a problem .
 

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Flippercon said:
If you do use Pothos ivy be cautious if you have other animals in the house. If it is ingested by a cat or dog it could be a problem .
Thanks, I appreciate the warning. :)
My weims used to get into everything so...now the house is pretty much weimaraner proof. (They've also consumed just about everything that fits in their mouth. Weims are a whole nutha' story. :roll: :lol: )

My tanks are no exception. Most of the them are 5' tall, (at the very least) so the plants will be fine. I'm thinking of the ivy or bamboo.
:thumb:
 

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If the pothos, or other plants do well on the aquarium water, why not use water change water to water the rest of your houseplants?
Kind of a way to have one hobby help another.
 

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Well my mother has the green thumb. So I take here 5-10 gallons a week for here plants. She is amazed on how good it works. If I had house plants I would but really don't get enough light in the apartment for them .
 

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Jimring said:
If the pothos, or other plants do well on the aquarium water, why not use water change water to water the rest of your houseplants?
Kind of a way to have one hobby help another.
I do that in my office. I have a six gallon tank and change out a bit weekly, rinse the filter pad in that water, then use it to water my office plants. They're growing like weeds.
 

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House plants should not be submerged in an aquarium, eventually they will just melt away, adding to your nitrate. However, just rooting them in a container on top of your aquarium and letting them grow above your aquarium is fine. There is a guy on various forums that sells containers to specifically do this, the set ups are called Ripariums, google it if your interested in seeing some really different pretty tanks. I have a bunch of the old style containers with the suction cups (they now make them with magnets), I would be willing to send one for the cost of shipping if anyone is interested to try this, pm me if your interested. Two of my tanks have philodendron's growing in these containers, I use flourite gravel to hold the plant (roots) in place. The roots grow into the tank, need cutting back often. Below is a pic of my 26g bow and the container in the tank...started with a small sprig, been growing about 8 months. With black painted back and the black flourite, you can hardly see the container.


 

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See confirmation everywhere. I do like those containers a lot. I have a 55 that I would like to put a bunch across the top. Maybe like a window planter across the back top full of this stuff. The tank is right in front of a window, trying for a curtain of ivy.
 

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Here is some interesting reading for you all.

Take a look at Table 1 and note the high nitrate consuming plants. My plan is to buy a plant growth bulb for a spare light and light my sump. In that, install an elevated drip tray constantly watered by a spare Fluval 204. In the drip tray will be a stryofoam planter or something else (not sure what is fish safe or not, any suggestions?) and plant one of those high potential grasses in it.

These plants grow very easily, can easily be trimmed, and soak up a lot of nitrate.
 

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As a point of interest, here is a list of floating plants used in wastewater treatment plants in order of nutrient uptake from highest to lowest. All are available to us from aquarium plant suppliers.

1) Water Hyacinth
2)Water Lettuce
3 Pennywort (Hydrocotlye sp)
4 Alligator weed (Alternathera sp)
5)Duckweed
6)Salvinia sp

I wonder where pothos and other house plants would fall on this list.
 

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Thank you for that! Do you have a source? I would love to read up more on this.

I'm not sure what the aquatic numbers are, but with those crops, I've been reading that 10,000 ppm in one growing season isn't out of the picture. It's more realistically 3,000-4,000. So even on the low end, commercial crops have a potential to take 58-76 ppm a week and a high end of almost 200 ppm a week. These measurements are per bale but I assume it would be a uniform measurement across and be relatively close to each plants absorbing potential. It would be interesting to see how these compare.

I just got the canister running in the sump last night without any problems so now I just have to figure out a way to build this planting tray.
 

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Hi.

There are a lot of replies, but I'll venture to add one more.

I've been using hornwart (floater with thin, radial leaves). I had it in a 'fuge, thinking that the fish would just devastate it in the main tank. But like some of the other posters, I just put a little piece in the tank and it grows faster than the inhabitants can eat it. Actually, only a couple of the cichilds mess with it at all.

As far a nitrate reduction, I have a 135 and a 29 gal refugium. I "harvest" the hornwart no less often than monthly, and it fills back up in between. In the main tank, it's like another 20-30 "gallons" of plant ball.

What I have found, is that the nitrate levels are much more stable, predictable, and understandable. I still have to change water, but the level doesn't go into the "blood red" color on the test kit as readily.

I'll keep going with the hornwart, and I like the ideas of a wall of pothos above my tank, so I think I'll add that too ... I also like the aesthetic look of the plants in the water. Baby fish like it too.

My $0.02,

djzman
 
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