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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
On February 8 I bought 5 africans from a local breeder. His fish always always healthy and tanks well maintained. Two weeks ago I lost a small placidochromis jalo reef, and today lost a small OB fryeri. Neither one were getting picked on, and the only sign of trouble was not really eating. After death both fish looked ok - no obvious red spots or bloating or anything.

Any ideas? Parameters are fine - nitrates usually run 20-40. Weekly 50% water changes, food once per day. 125 gallons, about a dozen other fish from 2 inches up to full size haps and peacocks. Assuming they came with something from the breeder they wouldn't have lasted that long and would have infected the established fish...
 

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Not all sick fish in a tank show symptoms at the same time.

Where were the fish that died hanging out in the tank? Harassed fish lurk under the surface or behind filter intakes or heaters after they give up on all the good spots on the substrate.

Do 50% water changes daily to get your nitrates to 10ppm.

What are the dimensions of the tank and what are the other species? Most common problems are caused by harassment and many fishkeepers are not able to see it and swear there is none to be observed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the quick replies. I'll try to a better job with the nitrates.

Fish were not hiding at all - just sort of hanging out and not eating. I didn't see them getting chased at all during the day, but maybe they were at night.
 

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Aggression is a strange creature. Sometimes it's just the presence of more dominate fish, not all the chasing and beating going on.

I had a eureka red once, he would dry up to skin and bones not eating. He had no marks of any kind. I'd put him in a tank by himself and he would eat like a starving dog. About three weeks of that and he was fat, happy and very colorful. I'd put him back in the main tank and nothing, no chasing, beating and most of all...no eating. About a month would go by and he'd be back to skin and bones. This went on for about a year, one month in and one month out. The last time he went into the main tank was the last time I was going to remove him for fattening. Two months later I scoped him out with my hand and that was that.

Guess this is one reason I enjoy fish keeping so much...always something to learn. :)
 

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The nitrates did not cause this. You need to determine if other fish are at risk.

What are the dimensions of the tank and what are the other species?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'm not so great with names, but here's the list.

Large male Insignus
Large female VC-10 (bought as juvenile)
Juvenile VC-10 (hopefully male)
Large male Red Empress
Medium male Turkis
Medium German Red
Juvenile Venustus
Juvenile Lemon Jake
Female OB peacock
Red zebra peacock
Red zebra-ish (mbuna-looking)
Unsexed aulonuocara
Juvenile male zimbabwe rock
Juvenile male fryeri
Juvenile linvingstoni

Guessing I'll need to weed out the red zebra mbuna, and obviously the females - although the (supposed) females are not stressed or getting chased.

Tank is a standard 6-foot 125gallon with two sunsun304b canister filters, sand substrate, several rocks.
 

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That would be a start. What is a red zebra peacock?
 

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Were they pooping anything weird and/or were their ani (idk the plural for anus) inflamed? Sometimes the inflammation is there, but the excrement is nonexistent. And by weird, I mean something like clear and stringy or white or some color other than the food you feed them.
 
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