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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
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I think it speaks for itself .... What's the best way to go about improving this situation
 

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Hi and Welcome to C-F!!!

That is a very good question and I don't know if there are any easy answers. It looks like a homemade tank set up or a custom tank build because it appears the glass was inserted after the wood shell was made.

Can you tell if the wood (bamboo) shell is physically attached to the glass anywhere? Do NOT try prying on anything until you can verify how this tank is assembled.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The glass is only seamed to the wood. But the inside wood (not the bamboo shell) is what has rotted, which is unfortunately attached to the bamboo shell.. The only thing I can think of is using the tank seal and making a very ugly coating just to keep the wood from getting wet again!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
We were advised to put PVC trim as a splash guard instead of replacing everything.
 

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I like the idea of using PVC trim board to protect the wood but I would clean up the existing damaged wood first by removing any rotted sections, treating any mold or mildew sections with either regular non-scented bleach OR a product such as Concrobium Mold Control.

Do any of this work prior to setting up the aquarium and be sure any bleach or mold control product over spray doesn't get in the aquarium.

If you do use the PVC trim board as a splash guard, fill any joints with an aquarium safe silicone sealant to keep the moisture away from the wood cabinet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Deeda said:
I like the idea of using PVC trim board to protect the wood but I would clean up the existing damaged wood first by removing any rotted sections, treating any mold or mildew sections with either regular non-scented bleach OR a product such as Concrobium Mold Control.

Do any of this work prior to setting up the aquarium and be sure any bleach or mold control product over spray doesn't get in the aquarium.

If you do use the PVC trim board as a splash guard, fill any joints with an aquarium safe silicone sealant to keep the moisture away from the wood cabinet.
Thank you so much for the advice! We got silicone sealant right after we got the PVC board :dancing:
We are slowly working the nailed wood away from the inner frame ensuring we dont detach anything that is holding it all together :eek:
Concrobium mold control, is that a "safer" choice than bleach? We are hoping we will be able to remove the tank from the casing once this last piece of wood has been pried off! So either of them shouldn't get in the tank at all (if this last piece releases the tank *fingers crossed*). I will post pictures and give updates as long as everything keeps going according to plan. :thumb:
 

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I am a fan of using bleach as a disinfectant but the Concrobium mold control product targets mold specifically so I would feel comfortable with either product. If you haven't already, check their website for a description of how the product works including the 'general' ingredients.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Okay, I've wiped the mold control on. Should I spray it down and let it soak in and dry a few days or just continue applying light coats with a towel? I'm afraid if I spray directly onto the wood that it will, one, be inside the tank and I'm scared I'll miss a spot when I clean it. The website says it is safe for animals but of course I will clean it a million and one times regardless of it being "safe". Two, I don't want it to somehow seep in and not dry when I'm beginning to place my PVC and sealant. Hair dryer would work to dry it well? I think
 

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I would just follow the directions on the bottle. The website directions state to 1) apply in a thin even layer over surface and let dry completely, 2) use a cloth or brush dampened with product to clean away any remaining mold stain or residue. I would then let it dry completely and naturally for about 24 hours or until the wood doesn't feel damp anymore.

I understand your concerns about any product getting inside the aquarium. You can make a barrier by taping some cardboard, Saran wrap, trash bag or plastic sheeting at the top edges of the glass to reduce the chance of over spray getting in the tank.

Once the product has completely dried, use a water dampened cloth to wipe off any product residue on the taped surface before removing the tape and whatever barrier you used.
 

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l_jdw;

From what I can make out, it sure looks like a custom built tank...and with some if not total disregard for what happens (and what is sure to happen) to wood in any tank set-up...namely that things get wet...either from aerator bubbles bursting at the surface, splashing or simply condensation...and you bought it (I don't mean to rain on your parade, but I hope you got it for not much!), because now you get to deal with the consequences...I'm having trouble making out the exact construction, but if it is absolutely not possible to replace the rotted wood, and I had to repair and reuse the tank, I'd treat it multiple times with an antifungus/mold to hopefully stop its progress attacking the wood, then clean the treated interior surfaces well, and let them dry well (in the sun for days, if possible) then prep the wood surfaces and (really!) seal them with epoxy (think boat-building!...because that what you're really doing...building an negative boat!) ...even using fiberglass to repair areas where rotten wood is weak or gone, so that no matter how wet the inside surface might get after this, the water cannot make its way into the wood again...and of course that's just the frame work...regarding glass and sealing...that is a separate and different story...RTV and epoxy do not play well together...!

Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
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Well...Updating as I promised ! :thumb:
I successfully trimmed all the PVC I had cut inaccurately MANY times by HD. I sealed all the PVC in place a day ago and it's dry now but we are giving it plenty of time to cure. We are hoping to set it up by next weekend for the fishy :dancing: :fish:
 

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Very nice job on the repairs with the PVC, I was hoping you'd provide an update. The tank looks very clean and I'm sure the PVC will help with protecting the existing wood as most of any splashes or moisture should fall back into the tank.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I'm also going to put a hinged lid on the PVC lip so it will really prevent the hood from any water splashes. I have my sponge filter ready and canopy is treated with the mold control. :)
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Nice work! Can't wait to see it all done. I'm jealous of your wooden fish on your wall. Love it!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
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Gotta clear coat the stand and then its done! Received the light and air pump today :dancing:
 

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l_jdw;

Repair and the whole tank look great!...and PVC is impervious to damage by water, so good there also...my only concern would be to assure drops on lid drop back into tank (not run down outside) but it looks like you've addressed that with lip(?)...time to get that baby wet and populate!

Cheers
 

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ljdw;

I looks very nice!...and I hope your materials and work was such that it continues to do so over the long haul!

Cheers
 
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