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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have 6 Geophagus OrangeHead size at 3". Today I bought 4 Geophagus Altifrons (2.5"-F0) and 4 Geophagus steindachneri (redhump-1.5"-F0). A male steindachneri has been rudely atacking to all geophagus. He occupied half of the tank. He is highly aggressive.

http://www.cichlid-forum.com/profiles/species.php?id=466 This fish is not peaceful, I am sure..

My friends please dont forget, this fish is new fish in the tank and he is little. My tank capacity is 107G I know, that is not enough for fishes but I thing, it is not the volume problem at now...

Is this highly aggressivity temperament with permanently or temporary??
 

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Steindachneri is one of the most agressive geophagus you could find comparable with the brasiliensis species.

I would guess it will stay like that. How many males?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
2 male, thats are so little (1.5" 3-4 cm) but they have a redhump head... 4 of the steindachneries are attacikng. Especially Dominant male is attacking them violently...

Dominant male :
 

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To reduce the aggressivity I think you could try to arrange more natural turf by adding stones, wood and create free sand areas separated from each other. Try make sure they have their own safe havens if possible
 

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that's odd. I had a pair of steindacneries with 4 geophagus red heads in 106 gal. tank and i never saw aggressivnes towards any other dweler's
 

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I have a 2" red hump now and see absolutley no aggression at all up to this point, mine is content to sift the bottom all day and doesn't really pay too much attention to the other fish. You could just have one fish that does not play well with others.
 

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G. steindachneri is a widely distributed species in the wild, and different populations will look and behave differently (which someday may result in another species breakup). I've kept two distinctly different fish that both would be currently identified as steindachneri. One was easy to breed and only moderately aggressive; though the big male did run a long 40 gallon tank, he did not chase down targets. The second was extremely aggressive, even harrassing much larger fish constantly, and very reluctant to breed. They also grew much more slowly than the first. I believe they may have been wild or close to wild, while the first were several generations removed, which is also a known aggression moderator.

There are also a couple of populations out there right now under "new species " names, but those are not valid as no such species descriptions exist.
 
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