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Scientific Name: Geophagus brokopondo
Tints and shades Font Rectangle Pattern Monochrome photography
Pronunciation: j
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Tints and shades Font Rectangle Pattern Monochrome photography
Geo. Origin: Lake Brokopondo, Surinam
Tints and shades Font Rectangle Pattern Monochrome photography
Habitat: Still or Slow-Moving Water with Root Tangles
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Diet: Omnivore
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Gender Differences: Monomorphic
Tints and shades Font Rectangle Pattern Monochrome photography
Temperament: Mildly Aggressive
Tints and shades Font Rectangle Pattern Monochrome photography
Conspecific Temperament: Aggressive
Tints and shades Font Rectangle Pattern Monochrome photography
Maximum Size: 6.5"
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Temperature: 80°F
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pH: < 7
Tints and shades Font Rectangle Pattern Monochrome photography
Water Hardness: Soft
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Difficulty: 4


Images:

Vertebrate Fin Fish Marine biology Underwater

Adult male
Photo Credit: Tom Halvorsen


Articles:
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Comments:
Geophagus brokopondo has been collected at several locations within Lake Bronkopondo, it is not known if it resides in nearby rivers. Since Lake Bronkopondo is a man-made lake, it reasons that it does. Wild specimens were mostly seen and captured over sandy bottoms, although they frequently escaped collecting nets by swimming into sunken roots and branches, as well as rocks (if they didn't just simply swim into deeper water). This makes collecting them in great numbers very difficult, and in a full day, one collector only managed to collect approximately 15 specimens.

It appears that they grow larger in captivity than they do in the wild. The male on the picture is about 6" long. Wild specimens grow no larger than 5".

Males are very aggressive to all tankmates. They should be kept in large tanks with lots of hiding places and preferably many females for each male.
 
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