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Your parameters are almost exactly what mine are.
Tap water - 7.6
Tank water - 8.0 (Aragonite substrate and basaltic lava rocks)

Do you have to worry about pH at all in your tank? My answer is no. In normal ranges (6.7 to 8), the changes in pH don't actually mean much is changing in the water.
Boring math answer - Because of the logarithmic scale pH is based on, the difference in hydrogen activity is 10 times greater from pH 7 to pH 8. The hydrogen activity from pH 8 to pH 9 is also 10x difference. So, going from a pH of 7 to a pH of 9 is 100x different, in terms of the potential for hydrogen to do things.

To apply this to fish keeping: A change of pH from 7.0 to 7.5 means almost nothing. A change from 7.5 to 8 will not be noticed by your fish. I do this weekly. A change from 8 to 8.5 is a very large swing and should be done slowly. 8.5 to 9 takes you out of the acceptable range for most fish, and the swing is drastic.

You are still within the range of where the pH swing means almost nothing to your fish. Even if you could swing this pH instantly (you can't with buckets. I mean literally within seconds) you really wouldn't be able to hurt cichlids.

The CO2 in your room almost certainly has a bigger effect on your pH than does any water or rock chemistry at this point. Please feel free to carry on.

Logarithmic pH scale referrence
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
@awesomismmama , which brand/type cichlid substrate do you have and which rocks are you using? Also which cichlid salt are you using and how much are you adding before or after a water change?

Sorry to derail your thread when I asked how you do water changes.

It sounds like your older tank has a steady 7.6 pH and your planned new cichlid tank varies in pH when you add new water, correct?
Thats quite alright! It's going to sound terrible, but I am not sure what the rocks are called. Bought them from a reputable fish store approximately an hour and a half from where I live (the only fish store around). The substrate is Carib-Sea substrate. I added a photo of the tank below to show the rocks. Each time I perform a water change the PH falls to 7.4, and approximately 24 hours later it goes right back up to 8.0. The tank is fully cycled with fish on the way, I am unsure of how to rectify this, because I know my fish won't appreciate the constant change in PH.
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No problem and nice looking tank.

Do you remember if it was the CaribSea African Cichlid Mix in white or the Eco-Complete Cichlid in white? Either way it doesn't really matter as both substrates are meant to raise or maintain pH and alkalinity in your aquarium.

IME, I tested my tap water (well water) for hardness (GH) and alkalinity (KH) and use the API GH and KH test kits to do so. This can give you a handle on what your tap water parameters are so you need to know IF you need to add buffers such as Seachem Cichlid Lake Salt which is what I assume you are adding to your tank, correct?

I'm not a fan of altering my tap water to suit specific species of fish so with MY tap water parameters, it is suitable for most Lake Malawi and Lake Tanganyika cichlids and my pH is around 7.4 to 7.6.

You can follow @SenorStrum advice and not worry about the difference in pH and do water changes as normal OR you can perform a slightly smaller water change and see what the pH values are. Do keep a written record of the frequency and percentage of water changed and the test results afterward PLUS once you get your fish, watch their behavior to see how they are acting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Your parameters are almost exactly what mine are.
Tap water - 7.6
Tank water - 8.0 (Aragonite substrate and basaltic lava rocks)

Do you have to worry about pH at all in your tank? My answer is no. In normal ranges (6.7 to 8), the changes in pH don't actually mean much is changing in the water.
Boring math answer - Because of the logarithmic scale pH is based on, the difference in hydrogen activity is 10 times greater from pH 7 to pH 8. The hydrogen activity from pH 8 to pH 9 is also 10x difference. So, going from a pH of 7 to a pH of 9 is 100x different, in terms of the potential for hydrogen to do things.

To apply this to fish keeping: A change of pH from 7.0 to 7.5 means almost nothing. A change from 7.5 to 8 will not be noticed by your fish. I do this weekly. A change from 8 to 8.5 is a very large swing and should be done slowly. 8.5 to 9 takes you out of the acceptable range for most fish, and the swing is drastic.

You are still within the range of where the pH swing means almost nothing to your fish. Even if you could swing this pH instantly (you can't with buckets. I mean literally within seconds) you really wouldn't be able to hurt cichlids.

The CO2 in your room almost certainly has a bigger effect on your pH than does any water or rock chemistry at this point. Please feel free to carry on.

Logarithmic pH scale referrence
Thank you so much! I didn't see your comment before posting my last one! Great to know it's nothing to worry about! :)
 
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