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Great advice from both. I have some questions -

Do you test your water before or after you add ammonia? What is your ammonia reading directly after adding it?
What test kit are you using?
What are your nitrates?

I do not do water changes when cycling, unless the cycle stops or slows down. This generally only happens when the nitrates get too high and create nitric acid and drop your pH below what the bacteria can function well at. This is not happening in your case as you say your pH is a solid 8.

You want to keep adding ammonia, because you're trying to grow a big colony of bacteria. To do this, you need to feed them. If you stop feeding them, they stop growing. They don't die if you stop feeding them. You will not lose your cycle. I would purchase some Fritz Aquatics Powdered Ammonium Chloride. $12, next day Prime delivery. It will last you literally the rest of your life if you're using it to cycle tanks.

The seeded media trick is good too. I've used tetra safe start and found it to be ineffective. The media trick is the best thing you can do. I do the "innoculate with squeezins" method. I figure this leaves little suspended particles of biofloc to stick to any surface they can and cycle the whole system.
 

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That's what I would do. I would add ammonia every day until nitrites also read zero the next day.
You should probably check nitrates and do a water change at this point though... they are probably off the charts high...

Fun fact! Although fish do poo, and they do have kidneys, ammonia is excreted constantly from the gills, actually. This fact adds nothing to the conversation whatsoever, I just find it entertaining. :ROFLMAO:
 

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1. Yes, I believe your tank is perfectly cycled.
a. This was quick because you added a bunch of seed bacteria in the substrate.
2. You can add anything to this tank now that the tank could legitimately hold.
3. No need to do that with the rainbows, unless you want to. The tank will hold now. If you're concerned, you should probably just continue dosing ammonia.

Do remember this though - 1ppm of ammonia measured using API master kit will produce about 20ppm nitrate measured with the same kit. Your nitrates are probably off the charts at this point, so remember to do a huge water change or two before you get stocking.
 

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Your parameters are almost exactly what mine are.
Tap water - 7.6
Tank water - 8.0 (Aragonite substrate and basaltic lava rocks)

Do you have to worry about pH at all in your tank? My answer is no. In normal ranges (6.7 to 8), the changes in pH don't actually mean much is changing in the water.
Boring math answer - Because of the logarithmic scale pH is based on, the difference in hydrogen activity is 10 times greater from pH 7 to pH 8. The hydrogen activity from pH 8 to pH 9 is also 10x difference. So, going from a pH of 7 to a pH of 9 is 100x different, in terms of the potential for hydrogen to do things.

To apply this to fish keeping: A change of pH from 7.0 to 7.5 means almost nothing. A change from 7.5 to 8 will not be noticed by your fish. I do this weekly. A change from 8 to 8.5 is a very large swing and should be done slowly. 8.5 to 9 takes you out of the acceptable range for most fish, and the swing is drastic.

You are still within the range of where the pH swing means almost nothing to your fish. Even if you could swing this pH instantly (you can't with buckets. I mean literally within seconds) you really wouldn't be able to hurt cichlids.

The CO2 in your room almost certainly has a bigger effect on your pH than does any water or rock chemistry at this point. Please feel free to carry on.

Logarithmic pH scale referrence
 
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